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do i have focus tracking

qaz
Contributor

hi

 

does anyone know if  i have focus tracking on my new 5d ll . Cant find mention of it on web

 

thanks

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

why do u say that? ....ive taught enough of them. do u also think i should improve my photograpy. What i need is to know how ai servo works , ill wait till i see a magazine or vid article on it [i did get some good video links here]

 

i think we should just leave it here before i get anymore comments from people like john sd

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kvbarkley
VIP
VIP

Maybe the manual would be better. Check out AI Servo AF.

can  some pls say if this post is in the wrong place or if my question is not interesting enough to get helpful replies

 

thanks

if no one here can help i may buy a manual


@qaz wrote:
if no one here can help i may buy a manual

You do not need to buy a copy of the manual.  Use this link to find your camera's support page, and download it for free.

 

https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/support

 

Your question is a bit vague.  Are you asking about focus tracking when shooting stills, or when shooting video?  I am pretty sure that your camera cannot track while shooting video.  If it can, then it does not do it very well.  Your camera employs different focusing systems for shooting stills and video.  This is why you really should read the manual.  There is too much information to cover.

 

As for shooting stills, AI Servo is good for tracking focus on a subject whose distance to the camera keep changing, which means the same AF point is used throughout the process.  Tracking is less effective for scenarios when the subject is moving across the frame, from one AF point to another AF point.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

hi

 

thats very helpful, i should have said its only stills i shoot

 

could you expand a bit on "the same AF point is used throughout the process" as i cant visulise that, if i knew how the process acually works then i could understand how to use it

 

i suspect the manual wouldnt tell me that

thanks

 

 

Given the question I gave the right answer. Check out these videos by Rudy Winston linked in this thread:

http://community.usa.canon.com/t5/EOS/Former-Nikon-user-needs-help-w-AF-on-a-5D-MK-I/m-p/160361/high...

yes i saw all the vids, helpful, p0inted out  2 things i didnt know but im still not clear on how servo focus works.

 

 


@qaz wrote:

yes i saw all the vids, helpful, p0inted out  2 things i didnt know but im still not clear on how servo focus works.

 

 


Until you become familiart with auto-focusing and "One Shot" focus mode, I woulldn't worry about "AI Servo" mode just yet.  

The "One Shot" AF mode is very good for photographing still life.  But, the mode is also good for action shots when used with a high enough shutter speed.

 

What is it that you're trying to photograph that requires tracking?  The difference between "One Shot" and "AI Servo" AF modes is pretty basic.  When you press the shutter button halfway, the camera will focus the lens, provided the lens has its' AF/MF mode switch set to AF.  

 

With One Shot mode, the camera will use the selected AF point to focus on a subject, and will issue a beep when it locks.  The selected AF point behavior is for the locked AF point to light up in red.  The real trick is controlling which AF point is used to lock focus.  Always using the center point is the easiest and simplest way to use the camera.  

 

You can configure the camera to always use the center AF point when you use one of the Creative shooting modes.  When you are using one of the Basic shooting modes, then the camera will automatically select an AF point for you.  The camera will typicallly select what it determine to be the nearest object to the camera, which can sometimes be what you want, and sometimes it won't.

 

With AI Servo mode, the camera locks focus on a subject when you press the shutter halfway, just like with One Shot mode.  However, with AI Servo the camera will continue updating the focus lock, because it will assume that the subject distance to the camera is constantly changing.  This shooting mode requires some rigorous practice to master.  Stick to One Shot mode until you become more familiar with the camera body.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

i can appreciate ur beginners advice however i should have said ive had a 5d for while and am familiar withe autofocus even though i dont understand it completely

 

i will be shooting animals in a pen or anything else that needs ai servo but thats not so important now

 

i was hoping to find an explanation with diagram, maybe on video of what accually goes on behind the scenes in ai servo, then everything falls into place and there are no more questions . Thats the way my brain works:)

 

thanks for the long explaination


@Waddizzle wrote:

@qaz wrote:

yes i saw all the vids, helpful, p0inted out  2 things i didnt know but im still not clear on how servo focus works.

 

 


Until you become familiart with auto-focusing and "One Shot" focus mode, I woulldn't worry about "AI Servo" mode just yet.  

The "One Shot" AF mode is very good for photographing still life.  But, the mode is also good for action shots when used with a high enough shutter speed.

 

What is it that you're trying to photograph that requires tracking?  The difference between "One Shot" and "AI Servo" AF modes is pretty basic.  When you press the shutter button halfway, the camera will focus the lens, provided the lens has its' AF/MF mode switch set to AF.  

 

With One Shot mode, the camera will use the selected AF point to focus on a subject, and will issue a beep when it locks.  The selected AF point behavior is for the locked AF point to light up in red.  The real trick is controlling which AF point is used to lock focus.  Always using the center point is the easiest and simplest way to use the camera.  

 

You can configure the camera to always use the center AF point when you use one of the Creative shooting modes.  When you are using one of the Basic shooting modes, then the camera will automatically select an AF point for you.  The camera will typicallly select what it determine to be the nearest object to the camera, which can sometimes be what you want, and sometimes it won't.

 

With AI Servo mode, the camera locks focus on a subject when you press the shutter halfway, just like with One Shot mode.  However, with AI Servo the camera will continue updating the focus lock, because it will assume that the subject distance to the camera is constantly changing.  This shooting mode requires some rigorous practice to master.  Stick to One Shot mode until you become more familiar with the camera body.


 

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