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Upgrading from My EOS 60D

levi41355
Contributor

I have a Canon EOS 60D. It's been great for me. most of the last 30 years, I've shot spots in my kids/grandkits school.

I have a Tamron SP 24-70mm F/2.8; A Tamron SP 70-200mm f/2.8; and a Tamron 45mm 1.8 lenses. These have served me well. And they are not that old. I'm now shooting indoor volleyball and basketball. As we all know, they can be pretty dark. I think my problem is not the lenses, but the camera. I"m looking for advice on updating my camera. My 45mm 1.8 lets enough light in, but my autofocus never gets there in time.

25 REPLIES 25

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

Hi and welcome to the forum

As always it is very helpful to get some idea of budget - the options are massive depending on what you want to invest.

Your lenses are all 3rd part EF units, so the first big question is, do you want to stick with a DSLR or go for a R-series MILC?

Without doubt the MILCs offer benefits for sport over the DSLRs, but you need to check the performance of your lenses with them, using the EF-RF adapter.

If you want to stay with the SPS-C format, the I would suggest the R7. A wise move might be to rent one (with adapter) for a period and see how the lenses perform. Note that the change will demand you study the camera's autofocus system to get the most from it.

If youvstick with DSLRs, then the 80d or 90d, or go full frame with the 5D4 or 6D2.

 


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

I was told that the lenses I have will fit a full frame. Is that not true? I have a bit of money in the lenses. I want to keep them. For a grand dad that takes pictures of his kids, I have quite a bit on money in it. I just shoot after work. I'm not a professional. I get the best shots because I know the games well. I know where to shoot. I just need more speed on the autofocus.

EF lenses will work on both APS-C bodies - like your 60D, and full-frame bodies.  There is no reason why you can't keep them but you have to decide which platform you want to go to. You have four choices:
DSLR:
APS-C - the 80D or 90D, both are excellent bodies but the autofocus may not be miles ahead of the 60D.
Full frame: 5DIV or 6DII, both are likely better in low light than the APS-C bodies, but will not give you the same field of view as the 60D did.  Objects will fill less of the frame.

MILC R-series bodies:  any of these will have much better tracking and better low light performance - you can literally get them to track specific players in a game.
APS-C: the R7 would be my suggestion.
Full frame: the R8 or R6 (either MkI or MkII) these have superior low-light performance, and brilliant tracking.

Since you STILL have not advised your budget - which is rather fundamental, no-one can advise you more than this.   As both Demetrius and I have said, your wisest choice if going for the R-series bodies is to trial your lenses on them - either borrow or rent the bodies.


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

I'm still studying this one out.

I'll lcheck into the R7.A.

thanks.

If you want a good explanation of the effective difference between FF and APS-C sensors as regards Field of View check out this video:
FULL FRAME vs APSC vs M4/3 - WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE? - YouTube

You are used to shooting with an APS-C sensor on the 60D, now because of its crop factor, EFFECTIVELY the field of view you have been enjoying is EQUIVALENT to 1.6 x what is the actual focal length of the lens - so:
24-70 on your camera has a FoV of 38.4-112mm
70-200 on your camera has a FoV of 112-320mm.

On any of the FF bodies, you will appear to have less magnification, as the crop factor for a FF sensor (in the 5DIV and the R6 or R8, is 1).


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

I was hoping I could get a used camera body, that would be better, for about $1,500.

Canon USA have a refurbished equipment on-line store.  They basically work as good as new and come with a limited guarantee.  I visited the site and found these two bodies, that might be of interest:
Products Comparison List - Magento B2B Edition (canon.com)

For a couple of reviews on the R6 autofocus (also for the R8 and R7), see:
(6) Canon R6 Face Detection Auto Focus for Sports Photography - YouTube'

A video on college basketball with the R6MkII and the R7:

Comparing the R6 and R7: 
Canon R6 vs R7! Is Aps-c Better Than Full Frame? - YouTube

(6) College Basketball Canon R6 Mark II & R7 - YouTube


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

deebatman316
Authority
Authority

First of all what is your budget for a new camera. 3rd Party lenses may or may not work on your new camera whether the native mount or adapted. I would rent a body to see if your 3rd Party lenses work correctly before buying a new camera. Then you'll know that your lenses work or don't work correctly after the fact. For new bodies you have 2 choices upgrade to Mirrorless or stick with a DSLR camera. You also have 2 sensor formats APS-C & Full Frame. APS-C (24x16) is smaller than 35mm Film. Full Frame is the same size as 35mm film (36x24) but now in the form of a digital image sensor.


-Demetrius

Current Gear: EOS 5D Mark IV, EF F/2.8 Trinity, EF 50mm F/1.8 STM, EF 85mm F/1.8 USM, 470EX-AI & 600EX II-RT

Retired Gear: EOS 40D
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