cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Upgrade recommendations from EOS Rebel T7

shantillee
Apprentice

I want to gift my husband a better camera body to replace his Rebel T7. The T7 works well for general pics and stills but not for indoor sports. He wants to get great action shots as our daughter plays indoor collegiate volleyball. I am looking at the 5D Mark IV. Advice would be appreciated!

24 REPLIES 24

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Greetings,

The 5D4 is one of the nicest full frame DSLR's available.  Its focus system is highly advanced and it set many standards for sports, wildlife, weddings, etc.

Your husband's existing T7 is a crop sensor camera.  This means none of his existing APS-C format lenses would work with a full frame body.  If he owns full frame EF lenses, these would work in a 5D4.  Can you tell us about the lenses he owns currently?  Models, etc.

Have you considered a mirrorless camera?  Do you have a budget for the upgrade?  We can provide more specific recommendations once we know what lenses he owns now and what your budget is.      

 

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10

~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8 ~CarePaks Are Worth It

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

@shantillee wrote:

I want to gift my husband a better camera body to replace his Rebel T7. The T7 works well for general pics and stills but not for indoor sports. He wants to get great action shots as our daughter plays indoor collegiate volleyball. I am looking at the 5D Mark IV. Advice would be appreciated!


The 5D4 is an excellent camera, but it is getting long in the tooth.  I would recommend the EOS R6 mark II, which can outperform the 5D4 by a wide margin.  It costs quite a bit less, even with the addition of the EF-RF mount adapter.  

Technically, you would still be able to use any of your existing Canon EF or EF-S lenses.  There is a major caveat with using the EF-S mount lenses, though.  The camera should automatically switch to “crop mode” when it senses a Canon EF-S lens.  This means images will be captured using only the center portion of the image sensor, which will significantly reduce the resolution of the captured images.

1AF9B39F-1BE8-433F-8166-22E07FD5C2F5.jpeg

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Tintype_18
Authority
Authority

FWIW, the replies have a trainload of good information for you. Looking at the prices, are they in line with your budget? Will the photographs be used for publication in newspapers, magazines, personal, etc.? I have had a T7 for about nine years. I have used it for indoor and outdoor photos; action baseball, action cross country, indoor archery, family parties, graduations, to name a few. Some of mine have been published in newspaper, magazine, online. I like to experiment with different settings to see what works best. Thank goodness for digital! Can't imagine what it was like in the film days. Now that things in life are slowing down, I plan on spending more time with the camera in hand while looking at the manual downloaded on my laptop. The camera is much smarter than me. Just don't ask my wife about this. Good luck on your decision.

John
Canon EOS T7; EF-S 18-55mm IS; EF 28-135mm IS; EF 75-300mm; Sigma 150-600mm DG

John_SD
Whiz

As you may know, mirrorless is the present and the future. I could not recommend taking a step back into outdated camera tech, thus the 5D IV is a no-go. The EOS R6 II is less costly and can shoot rings around the unwieldy old brick. And it will be a step into mirrorless and full-frame at once, a win-win for any photographer. If you can, I would purchase one with a kit lens to keep your costs down. Enjoy. 

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

They guys were reading my mind.  The R62 was going to be my recommendation.  Less expensive and more advanced in comparison.  Many people do not believe mirrorless is within their reach, but in fact, they are, and can ultimately outperform their former DSLR counterparts, and provide a future proof solution in the long term.  His current lenses are the only question that remains unanswered.        

This is also attractive:

shadowsports_0-1700838002633.png

shadowsports_1-1700838086322.png

There are some added bundle discounts as well when you purchase specific camera bodies.

If you purchase a Canon EOS R3 or Canon EOS R5, you can add the Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM for only $499 more. Simply add everything to your cart to see the kit discount.

You can also add the RF 24-105mm f/4-7.1 IS STM to your purchase of either the Canon EOS R6 Mark II or Canon EOS R6 for only $99.  Supplies are limited.

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10

~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8 ~CarePaks Are Worth It

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

Perhaps the most logical move would be to the 90D. OK, not a mirrorless but it will be completely familiar to him going from a T7. Sometimes old tech isn't a bad choice and, yes, I totally agree the future is in the R series of cameras.

Here's my thought, the 90D body is around $1200. Now if you were considering some other camera that is in the $2200 to $2400 range the saving would allow you to purchase some faster lenses for the 90D. In the end lenses is where it at. I used a ef 85mm f1.2L lens when I did volleyball shoots. But the outstanding ef 85mm f18 lens ($500) could be a super choice. Although no longer being made but a used ef 70-200mm f4L ($500) could be a very good choice.

My personal best case and I would put it up against any R series camera out there  perhaps not feature vs feature but photo vs photo is the 90D with a Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art Lens. And still be around $400 less than the cameras suggested above.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

John_SD
Whiz

"I would put it up against any R series camera out there..."

LOL. It probably took you forever to give up the old Rollieflex.

Give it up?  I just got one. You mean they have something better available..

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

Hi and welcome to the forum:

As several of my colleagues have mentioned, it is challenging for us to give you relevant advice without some idea of budget.  We could easily suggest equipment that you simply are not prepared to invest in.  Also, you need to consider the optics as much as the body. 

Personally, I would prefer to choose my own camera equipment, based on my shooting preferences and knowledge.  While specs can be helpful, there is also the tactile feel of handling a camera and lenses to consider.  Thus, my first suggestion would be to consider taking him out shopping - explain what you are wanting to do and go have lunch with him, then go to a store with him and let him enjoy, with you, the experience of a surprise camera shopping spree.  That takes a lot of the responsibility off you, but lets you enjoy the whole experience with him and it could well give you both a great pleasure of the experience.

Alternatively, if you want to get the gear as a surprise, then you need to consider what gear he has apart from the basic camera body.  The complexity of upgrading will be, to a degree, determined by what can be transferred to the new unit, if that is possible.  While the camera body itself impacts many aspects of photography, the lenses have a huge impact on the performance in low light and long reach situations, so knowing the EXACT makes and models of the lenses will help us to help you to make a choice. 

Basically, the camera he owns is a good, but very basic crop (APS-C) sensor camera - this means that the sensor that records the image is smaller than what is called a Full Frame (FF) sensor, which is the size of a frame of 35mm film.  Canon and compatible lens makers made a range of EF and EF-S lenses that will work with this camera. However, EF lenses would be compatible with a FF and the APS-C camera, but if he has EF-S lenses they will work only with the APS-C body. 

So, step 1 is to check if the lenses say EF or EF-S on the front of the barrel, and also the numbers thereafter, which are its focal range (e.g. EF-S 18-55) and size of aperture (f:4.5-5.6) - which indicates performance in low light - significant if shooting in low light situations.

Tronhard_0-1700851206947.jpeg

If your husband has EF-S lenses that you want to use, and you want to stick with a DSLR camera (same style as he has but newer), then he must stay with an ASP-C body, such as the 90D that my colleague Ernie suggested.  If you were to go for the 5D option which is a FF unit, the EF-S lenses simply will not physically attach, so you need to get a whole new suite of lenses too - and that can be a significant cost.  Also, DSLRs are living on borrowed time and are being no longer developed.

The alternative is to consider a Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera (MILC), which is the new generation of cameras that Canon is producing.  These not only are where future developments will be, but they offer many features that DSLRs simply do not do, or do as well.  Some of these can be quite significant to the intended use, such as the ability to focus on and track faces and even eyes.  They also have better sensors for low light work and generally better performance as they are mostly much newer technology than the latest DSLRs.

These also come in the same two sensor formats: FF and APS-C.  They have a different lens (RF) mount, but the good news is that if the lenses your husband has are of good quality, then it would be practical to use them on an R body via one of the Canon EF-RF adapters and they should work well.  However the same principles apply as to compatibility between EF-S lenses and sensor size, but for a different technical reason. 

So, if the intention is to keep any existing EF-S lenses and just get a new MILC body, then you should consider an APS-C R-series body, such as the Canon EOS R7, which would be the current best choice in this format for sports, and is the equivalent of the 90D DSLR, and it has eye and face tracking and In-Body-Image-Stabilization (IBIS) that helps to reduce camera shake when taking pictures at distance and/or low light with slower shutter speeds. 

If he has EF lenses then, as my colleagues also offered, only those can be used on a FF body, such as the Canon EOS R6 or R6MkII (both are good) that have FF sensors, and his existing EF lenses should work with them.

The third option is to just buy him a whole new kit of body and lenses.  For the purpose at hand, I would suggest the R6 or R6MkII for their tracking, low-light performance and IBIS.  As regards lenses, then you would be looking at something like the RF 24-105mm f/4-7.1 IS STM,  and the RF 100-400 f:5.6-8 IS STM lenses.  If that is too expensive, then consider the RF 24-240 f:4-6.3 IS STM lens.

If this all sounds too complicated (and I don't know your own photography knowledge), then option one might be the safest bet, but perhaps give him a bit of warning to let him mull over these issues to make his own informed decision - sometimes anticipation and planning are half the fun!  This takes the responsibility off you for choosing the gear, but lets  you enjoy his joy of the process and his pleasure at a surprise shopping experience.


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
Avatar
click here to view the press release
Announcements