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Thoughts on an EOS Rebel T7 for a beginner?

barkietrin7
Apprentice

I’ve been interested in photography for a while now but have never owned a “nice” camera before. I’ve been doing some browsing the past few months after being a second shooter for a friend at an event. I’ve been having trouble figuring out whether the T7 is a good fit.

I’ve been looking at the EOS M50 as well since I’ve probably seen the most people recommend this one as a great beginner camera. When I stopped by my local camera shop they told me there was a month long promo for the T7 and also recommended it as a great beginner camera.

I looked at a few sites that did side by side comparisons of both models, but I would still love feedback from individuals as well.

Any thoughts, good or bad, about either model would be greatly appreciated!

16 REPLIES 16

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

If you were a second shooter, what camera body did you use?  Was it a Canon?

 

What camera did the lead shooter use?  What is their advice on selecting a camera?

 

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If your interest leans more towards photography than videography, or at least you currently feel that it is, the Rebel T7 DSLR may be a better fit than the M50, which seems aimed a demographic that may be more interested in videography than photography. 

 

I am not a fan of the wireless connectivity in the T7, which includes outdated NFC, instead of Bluetooth.  Also, the T7 wireless connectivity is aimed at mobile devices, and not a home computer or laptop.  Built-in wireless in just about any consumer camera does not mean it is fully networkable.  A full featured network card could cost as much as the entire camera kit.

 

If you are interested in wireless communication for remote control, look for a camera body that includes both Wi-FI and Bluetooth, not the now outdated NFC hardware.  Most of the Canon Rebel line of wireless bodies seem to only have NFC.  Bluetooth makes the wireless connection very easy, and it is connection process that most people are more familiar with.

 

The M50 also uses MFC, but it also includes Bluetooth.  It has a newer CPU, and wider ISO range specification.  The M50 is capable of capturing up to 10 frames per second, which is probably more than double the rate of the T7.  The M-Series bodies are really great for casual photographer, who wants a camera for vacations or special events.  I would not recommend an M-Series body for use by a photo enthusiast, but only because there are better choices that are DSLRs.

 

What an M-Series body does not have is the ability to use the wide range of Canon EF/EF-S mount lenses.  All Canon M-Series bodies use an EF-M lens mount .  Canon sells a mount adapter so that M-Series cameras can use the larger EF/EF-S lenses, but the larger lenses do tend to drain the battery more quickly than native mount EF-M lenses.

 

Overall, I think the M50 is the better choice between the T7 and the M50 for basic photography.  However, the Canon selection of EF-M lenses is nowhere as near as broad as the EF/EF-S lens lineup.  I think it would be major mistake to buy an M-Seires body with the intent to use the mount adapter so that you could use EF/EF-S mount lenses.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

kvbarkley
VIP
VIP

I think you should just go for a T8i. It is no harder to use than a T7 and adds some features that may be beneficial down the road.


@kvbarkley wrote:

I think you should just go for a T8i. It is no harder to use than a T7 and adds some features that may be beneficial down the road.


I agree, except the T8i is double the price of the T7 and M50 camera kits.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

Budget was not mentioned in the OP.

"I think you should just go for a T8i."  

 

This is the correct answer. Even if the OP has to spend a few dollars more it is worth it.  No way buy the M50, it is a dead end.

It is almost always best to go with the newer tech.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

"I’ve been interested in photography for a while now ... "

 

This is the statement that makes me believe the OP would quickly outgrow a T7.  Better to spend a little more for a camera that will take you and stay with you farther.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Quiet
Enthusiast

Be aware that the T7 like the SL3 has no universal flash contact on the hot shoe for 3rd party flashes. That's the big, forward-most contact on every DSLR form everyone else and every SLR since the '60s. The spot for that is filled with black plastic.

 

This means that if you want an on-camera flash bigger than the built in pipsqueak, you are limited to Canon speedlights that can communicate with the camera via the four smaller contacts that are on the hot shoe.

wakiamay
Apprentice

Forget buying a "beginner" camera. You should be looking for a camera that will allow you to do the kind of photography you want to do, within your budget. I personally just like doing random photography and wanted something I could grow into, so I went for a Canon EOS RP body and grabbed the RF 24-105 L used and then borrow my wife's lenses. If you're just looking to have something to mess around with but don't plan on getting really serious, then I'd rather look at the Canon Rebel SL2, which my wife started with, or the SL3 that recently came out. No matter what camera you go for, buy just the body. Don't waste the money on the 18-55 kit lens (it's a dumpster fire at best) and get the EF 50mm 1.8 STM for like $100 to start out. You can buy new/refurbished camera bodies from Canon's website, or elsewhere via Google. If I knew more about your budget/type of photography you plan on doing, I can better guide you.

"Don't waste the money on the 18-55 kit lens (it's a dumpster fire at best).."

 

Purest horse hockey. It's marvelous and flexdible tool to help a beginner to learn and to develop preferences that may later be served by a more specialized lens.

 

At 55mm I've found it to be sharper than my Takumar 55mm f2.0.

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