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The brightness and clarity of the screen image and captured image are different in EOS M200

joyusa
Apprentice

The brightness and clarity of the screen image and captured image are different in EOS M200.

 

 

4 REPLIES 4

John_Q
Product Expert
Product Expert

Hello joyusa,

You may want to take a look at the Exposure Simulation setting on the camera. Make sure that the camera is set to one of the Creative modes, P, Av, Tv, or M. This can be found in the red camera menu #3. If the issue persists, then I would suggest resetting the camera to factory default settings. This can be found in the yellow wrench tab #5.

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

Hi Joy and welcome to the forum:
Frankly, the rear screen is not the best arbiter of brightness or exposure accuracy of an image you have recorded. How bright or otherwise the captured image will appear depends on the lightness levels set for the LCD display, and the ambient light in which one views the image. 
If you want an accurate rendition of how bright, over or under-exposed an image is, use the display or info button to show you the image histogram.  That gives a very accurate display of how exposure levels are distributed across an image.

Tronhard_0-1705618896085.png

For further information on this see: 

 


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

Here we go again.🤔 Hardly anybody consults the histogram for exposure. I too recommend, " I would suggest resetting the camera to factory default settings. This can be found in the yellow wrench tab  #5. That is always the best action to take when your camera isn't functioning like you think it should. Its best to keep things simple before you jump into the more challenging solutions.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

It would be less of a gross generalization to say hardly anyone Ernie knows, since I don't think he can speak for the photographic world at large, much as he needs to think he does. 

Certainly, there will be folks who, for various reasons, don't know how to use one or don't choose to do so, and that's fine - it's not a panacea, it's another tool and it remains a valuable one, especially (as I already mentioned) considering the limitations of LCD screens and the impact of ambient light when checking a very small screen.  So, since you were concerned about the veracity of the image when trying to view it on your LCD, this is more likely to be something you will find valuable as another resource.  

Learning to use a histogram is not a 'challenging solution': it's good photography practice.  Knowing how to use a histogram is relevant in both reviewing a shot image in the camera, and in carries on into post-processing the image.  It's also a great learning tool for when one is going to make adjustment to exposure and colour balance.  As one gets experience associating a range of image with their histograms, it may mean that one has to consult them less, but there will always be situations when a check is valuable.  One of the great things is that most cameras will display both the image and the histogram in the same display, so you can check both ways at the same time.

I personally don't use it all the time, however it is relevant when I want to be assured of the exposure and/or colour balance in an image, then I will check the histogram, especially if the light under which I am viewing presents challenges.
  
Don't take my word, Ernie's, or Canon's word for it : here are references to the benefits of using a histogram.
How to Read Your Camera's Histogram | B&H eXplora (bhphotovideo.com)
https://fstoppers.com/education/histogram-still-relevant-todays-photography-644077
To quote the conclusion paragraph from that article:
"The histogram, a tool deeply rooted in the history of photography, remains relevant and valuable in today's photographic landscape. While technological advancements have automated many aspects of exposure control, the histogram continues to serve as a creative tool, a reference for technical accuracy, and an educational aid for photographers of all levels.

In a world where the line between photography and digital art blurs, the histogram provides a bridge between technical precision and artistic expression. It enables photographers to make conscious decisions about exposure and tonal distribution to create images that convey their unique vision.

As technology continues to advance, the histogram's role may change, but its significance in the world of photography endures. It remains a trusted companion for photographers, helping them to capture and craft images that are both technically sound and artistically compelling. So, while the tools of photography evolve, the histogram's relevance persists, proving that some aspects of the art are timeless and irreplaceable."

If that is not enough, I encourage you to search for articles on understanding an gauging exposure - I suspect you will find the overwhelming majority of them support the value of histograms as a tool.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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