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Sunrise photos? Canon EOS T7

Tintype_18
Authority
Authority

I have an opportunity to get some great sunrise photos. We have too many power lines, trees, etc. that get in the way around the house. I can get the photos that are clear without having to edit them. Our church parking lot faces east so the sun will come up over a ridge about 300 yards away. My question: As noted below, I have the T7 and the listed lenses. What can I do or set the camera to prevent frying the insides? Thanks. Will share a photo or two.

John
Canon EOS T7; EF-S 18-55mm IS; EF 28-135mm IS; EF 75-300mm; Sigma 150-600mm DG
11 REPLIES 11

stevet1
Whiz
Whiz

John,

Try catching the sky before the sun breaks the horizon. If you can't do that, try putting something between you and the sun like the trunk of a tree or some bushes.

Here's one I took last year.:

sunrise pano.jpg

Steve Thomas

zakslm
Enthusiast

Tintype_18,

I have the same camera and shooting sunrises and sunsets can be challenging.  First of all, I don't think shooting into a sunrise will damage the camera or the sensor unless you do so on Bulb for very long exposure.  A series of exposures for a fraction of a second each should be OK but perhaps others who are more knowledgable can provide more insight into this.

There is a previous thread that I replyed to here: https://community.usa.canon.com/t5/EOS-DSLR-Mirrorless-Cameras/EOS-T6-Trouble-with-bracketing/m-p/43... .  On that thread others replied and offered some very helpful advice and tips.  

With the camera on a tripod, I would suggest using exposure compensation and auto-bracketing as was discussed in the above reference thread and then (I have yet to do this for sunrise/sunset photos but I will soon), using the HDR Composting Tool in Canon DPP4 to combine the bracketed sets into one HDR image and see what happens. 

 The advice from ebiggs1 on that thread was an "Ahah!" moment and in playing with DPP4, I've found you can use the HDR Composting Tool for bracketed JPEG or RAW images straight out of the camera (I've played with HDR composting 3 JPEG images or 3 RAW images, but not a combination of JPEG and RAW images, but that may work as well - who knows?). ebiggs1 highly recommends using RAW images, but I'm still trying to teach myself how to do so in DPP4 and learning DPP4 in general.

Good luck!

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

John what lens are you planning to use for  your images?

What mode are you planning to shoot in?  If you choose something like Av mode, the camera's exposure will likely under-expose the image, which can be effective, but you can increase the exposure compensation gradually to brighten that up with follow-up images.

Normally, shooting a sunrise and sunset should not pose risks to your camera sensor because at a low declination there is much more atmosphere between you and the sun. Secondly, well before you burn out the camera sensor, you should have overexposed the image, hence my suggestion about using Av mode.

Normally risk to a camera is a challenge when shooting at higher angles using a super-telephoto lens, the worst case scenario being when shooting a lunar eclipse when the sun is completely dark and suddenly becomes very bright again.

 


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Tintype_18
Authority
Authority

Thanks to all. Lens: I tend to experiment with the lenses I have listed; likely the 75-300mm and/or the 150-600mm. Experiment with camera settings. I could let my wife take the photos as she is locked in at Auto.:D The church is only 2 miles away so it's easy to set up. A tripod is a must as I don't feel that hand held shots would be good. Plus, i could take multiple photos as the sun rises. Some clouds show up as pink. The tree line would serve as a sort of horizontal border; shoot as the light becomes visible to a section of the sun as it rises. Right now, the sun becomes visible before 8 AM, Eastern time. Thanks as I plan on a few visits. Will see what happens and share the photos here.

John
Canon EOS T7; EF-S 18-55mm IS; EF 28-135mm IS; EF 75-300mm; Sigma 150-600mm DG

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

When shooting sunrise or sunset photos, don’t forget to look behind you.  Sometimes the best shots are with the sun to your back!

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

Every photographer goes through the sunrise sunset period. The best advice is to get up close and friendly with Photoshop. A red Sun won't harm your camera. HDR is your friend.

123.jpg456.jpg

A quick shot of a yellow Sun won't harm your camera.

789.jpg

147.jpg

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

BTW, learning HDR can be quite interesting for general shots. They don't always have to be that tough dog of a photo. But, remember sometimes less is more.

 

258.jpg

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Tintype_18
Authority
Authority

What is HDR? A book I have speaks of the golden hours...just before sunset and just after sunrise. I plan on taking my camera kit and try different lenses.

John
Canon EOS T7; EF-S 18-55mm IS; EF 28-135mm IS; EF 75-300mm; Sigma 150-600mm DG


@Tintype_18 wrote:

What is HDR?


"High Dynamic Range". Look in your cameras manual for AEB (auto exposure bracketing). PSE should have an HDR routine to combine the bracketed shots, if not DPP 4 does.

Newton

EOS R5, R6, R6II. RF 15-35 f/2.8L, 50mm f/1.2L, 85mm f/1.2L, 100mm f/2.8L Macro, 100-400mm, 100-500mm L, 1.4X.
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