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Suggestions for a new replacement camera

UncleJoe
Contributor

 Hello and thank you in advance for your help with this matter. I've had a Canon Rebel XT for the last 12 years and I want to upgrade at this point. Over time I have accumulated some accessories for the XT that I obviously want to be able to roll over for usage with what ever I chose to replace the XT with. I am hopeful and assuming that the lens I have will be of some standard, I also have a remote for the shutter the additional battery pack that mounts to the bottom of the body a standard mount flash ect. I can provide specific model numbers if that would be more helpful. At a glance I was looking at the t7i model on the belief that being part of the rebel line it might be compatible, but I am open to any and all suggestions. I am old enough to know that one can reach a point where one is better off starting from scratch if that is the case than so be it. 

 My interest in photography is general but I have been thinking of doing some star field shots (astronomical), landscape some occasional portrait work and as a grandfather I would not mind having some basic video capabilities available. Thanks again for any assistance! 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

TCampbell
Elite
Elite

After your camera model, Canon came out with the 7D (with the 18MP sensor) and used the same sensor in the T2i, T3i, T4i, T5i, and 60D cameras.  It wasn't until the T6i that they put a new sensor in the camera (with some gains over the performance of the long-running 18MP that they used for years).  

 

But when they released the T7i and 77D they replaced the sensor yet again and this time the camera got some VERY significant gains.  The T7i & 77D are a huge upgrade over any previous Rebel series camera (most other models were very small gains over the prievious year's model.)

 

This is why I'd agree that you should look at either the T7i or 77D.  The two camera have the same sensor but mostly different body features.

 

If you look at the "top" of each camera, the T7i has dials and controls much like your current camera (it's changed a tiny bit and there are a few extra buttons but it's mostly going to look very similar to what you have now).  But if you look at the top of the 77D... the mode dial is moved to the other side of the viewfinder and in it's place there is now an LCD display screen (not video - just simple LCD) which has all the current exposure info, etc. all displayed.  

 

Also, another significant change is on the back of the camera.  On your camera you have a simple up/down/left/right button (which also access different functions).  This is the same (or very similar) on the T7i.  But on the 77D the buttons have a knurled rotation ring (wheel) around them and you can rotate it.  If you like to shoot with manual exposure, the front wheel (next to the shutter button) changes the shutter speed and the rear-dial (which you can easily access with your thumb) changes the aperture (f-stop).  This makes it much faster to control than your current camera.

 

The extra display and dial are features of the mid-grade and pro-grade cameras.   I think the difference for the "body only" price is about $50.  The camera performance, resolution, ISO, focus system, etc. etc. are all identical (they have the same sensor.)

 

One noteable MISSING feature... Canon does not make a battery grip for either the T7i or the 77D ... nor can you use a grip from a previous model camera.

 

If you want a battery grip, you should probably look at a Canon 80D.

 

Other than that, all cameras can use the same lenses that you've been using on your Canon XT.

 

If you are using the same entry-level lenses that might have been included with your XT (such as the 18-55mm zoom) then you would want to be aware that the new versions of those lenses are significantly improved.  The new versions have at "STM" suffix on the name (e.g. Canon EOS EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6mm IS STM)  (I bolded the "STM").  This means the lens has Canon's new "stepper motor" focusing system (very quiet and smooth) but Canon also updated the optics.  The new lenses are a bit sharper.  The EF 50mm f/1.8 lens was updated with an "STM" version which also updated the number and shape of the aperture blades so now the out-of-focus blur (background blur) is much smoother & creamier than the old generation.

 

 

 

You wont be able to use the battery pack (battery grip) that mounted on the bottom of your XT (battery grips are always camera model-specific and never carry over to any new model).  

 

You should find that your remote (wired) shutter release fits and works just fine (it probably has a jack that looks like a mini headphone jack).   However all of these cameras now support WiFi and you can actually  use a smartphone (there's a free app) to remotely control the camera.

 

All the new cameras have video capability (it wouldn't matter which model you get) although of note... these new cameras now have Canon's Dual-Pixel CMOS AF (a feature previously only found on mid-grade and high-end models).  The Dual-Pixel CMOS AF allows the camera to use a phase-detect-like focus system (light passes through a beam-splitter (pism) to split it into two phases.  If the light re-converges in-phase then the camera is focused at that particular position... if not, then the lens is not focused and the direction and distance of focus can instantly be determined by comparing the two phases.  

 

Ok, so that sounds technical (and it is) but what it means to YOU is that the camera can do continuous auto-focus during live-video and it can follow your subject as they move closer or farther ... the camera tracks focus very accurately and you wont see the camera "hunt" for focus.

 

You'll get better audio quality if you attach an external microphone (specifically you should check out the Rode VideoMic Pro which is a "powered" external mic with enough gain to avoid that "hiss" sound you often hear on other mics).  It's designed to mount in the hot-shoe socket on top of the camera.  

 

The "STM" lenses (the new lenses) have focus motors which are no so quiet that it's extremely difficult to hear them when recording video (you probably wont hear anything but if you try really really hard ... you might just barely make out the sound of the focus motor.)

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

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57 REPLIES 57


@UncleJoe wrote:
I can see I'm going to learn a great deal here! I hope that at some point I will be able to repay all of your kindness and the tremendous amount of knowledge I have received from you and all of the contributors in this forum!

Get a good camera.  Worry about quality lenses later.  The 80D and the 18-55mm STM in the Refurb store is a steal.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

UncleJoe
Contributor
The temptation was to great so I went with the t7i body and the 18-135 IS STM that you had suggested for a starter. I am completely enthralled with it! I can not put it down! I also bought the microphone that was suggested the (Rode) at my grandson behest. The 80D is not out of the picture yet, I am still considering that deal as well! Thank you once more for all of your insight, I am extremely grateful!


@UncleJoe wrote:
The temptation was to great so I went with the t7i body and the 18-135 IS STM that you had suggested for a starter. I am completely enthralled with it! I can not put it down! I also bought the microphone that was suggested the (Rode) at my grandson behest. The 80D is not out of the picture yet, I am still considering that deal as well! Thank you once more for all of your insight, I am extremely grateful!

It's hard to see how you could go far wrong with that rig, at least for the time being. By the time you need to replace it, you probably won't be asking us questions; you'll be helping us answer them.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Quote, "It's hard to see how you could go far wrong with that rig,..."

 

Ya done good !  Now concentrate on using and learning your T7i.  Forget the 80D for a while.  You have an extremely capable camera and lens combo in the newest Rebel.

 

If you still have an itch for gear look at a fast prime like the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens or perhaps, even a better choice,  the Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM Lens.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@UncleJoe wrote:
The temptation was to great so I went with the t7i body and the 18-135 IS STM that you had suggested for a starter. I am completely enthralled with it! I can not put it down! I also bought the microphone that was suggested the (Rode) at my grandson behest. The 80D is not out of the picture yet, I am still considering that deal as well! Thank you once more for all of your insight, I am extremely grateful!

Great combo.  Using P mode will help you learn the camera's features.  Taking photos will help you learn photography.

I used the same lens with my Rebel for over a year before I handed it down to my son.  It is an excellent standard zoom.

 

You may want to take a few test shots with the flash, though.  You may want to invest in an external flash.  To be honest, I invested in the EF-S 24mm STM because it was cheaper than the flash I wanted.  Wireless RF flashes were just coming out.

 

The built in flash of a Rebel T5 does not raise up high enough to fully clear the lens.  In other words, I would see a dark shadow at the bottom of shots, which was due to the length of the lens blocking light from the built-in flash.  The Rebel T7i body is probably not much larger than a T6.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

UncleJoe
Contributor
The EF 35mm f/2 IS USM is on the Canon refurbished site I believe I will purchase that lens. One question I have is that it is listed to be a wide angle lens. My knowledge with wide angle is limited, do they create distortion on the edges? With the price of the 50mm lens being as reasonable as it is I might just purchase that one as well.
I have the SPEEDLITE 580EX flash that I have used with my EX four years, would have the ability to fill the needs for the lens that I purchased? Your son is a lucky man to have a father with such great knowledge!
One other thing that I have been considering is a star tracking device I have not seen any questions on this forum about them, should I start a new topic or is it proper to bring that up here? I know that I am asking a great deal so if I am over stepping please say!
Thanks for all of your help! You folks are truly wonderful!

"The EF 35mm f/2 IS USM is on the Canon refurbished site I believe I will purchase that lens."

 

It will be a great addition to your gear.  It is not a WA on your T7i.  It is 'normal' viewing.  That is one reason it is so nice to have.  Plus it is much faster than the zoom you bought.

 

"...my EX four years, would have the ability to fill the needs for the lens that I purchased?"

 

It will do fine.

 

"I have been considering is a star tracking device"

 

Go for it.  You may want to consider some more appropriate lenses for astro-photography.  Perhaps the Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 ED AS UMC manual lens or the Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Lens manual lens.  Of course Canon has outstanding lenses in this focal length but they tend to be very expensive.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

I have found a Rokinon 14mm T3.1 ED AS IF UMC, Canon Fit online used at a firm called MPB.Com for $250. The price seems good it is listed in like new condition does that seem to be a good deal? I am going to go ahead and place it, I can cancel it if it does not seem appropriate.


@UncleJoe wrote:
I have found a Rokinon 14mm T3.1 ED AS IF UMC, Canon Fit online used at a firm called MPB.Com for $250. The price seems good it is listed in like new condition does that seem to be a good deal? I am going to go ahead and place it, I can cancel it if it does not seem appropriate.

That could be a pretty good deal.  Just remember, that it is a not new, it is like new.  

I have never heard of that company before.  Then again, I do not look for used gear. Exercise caution if you found it through eBay or Amazon.  Look for reviews of the vendor.  I think a great source for used gear is KEH.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Thank you for the response! The company is out of the city and there inventory seems fairly vast from Canon to Nikon, Hasselblad and lenses of all make and model. While I understand that does not instantly qualify them for greatness they did come as a stand alone with a straight search on google. Not though ebay nor amazon of which I agree whole heartedly with you on their varsity. I prefer to purchase new as well but these are uncharted grounds for me and in those situations I thought it more prudent to test the waters or skies so to speak without a major investment. Thank you again!
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