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R6 Continuous not as fast with EF glass?

SamGruverPhoto
Apprentice

Hey guys!

I have had my R6 now for about a year and love it! My only concern is I shoot primarily EF glass (70-200 2.8, etc.) for the action sports and motorsport photography I do. I noticed that with my RF 50, my continuous mechanical shutter mode is much faster than my 70-200 2.8 EF lens. My EF glass is adapted so I assume that's the issue, but I have no idea. If it's a setting I have been missing this whole time I would be much happier than being told I'll have to upgrade to RF glass in order to use max frame rate. 

I would use the mirrorless continuous function, but I was told there could be warping with moving subjects. #r6

Let me know and thanks for the help!

SG

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

If you have older EF lenses that were initially released prior to 2009, then those lenses may exhibit degraded performance with the advanced AF and tracking features.

121FCC5A-5616-4446-9F3E-CF58A7055435.jpeg6621B945-2A60-43F7-AF43-58A04E60FE35.jpeg

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

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wq9nsc
Authority
Authority

Also realize that a fairly wide angle prime is going to have far faster focus behavior than a telephoto zoom regardless of its technological age.  

I shoot primarily with Canon 1DX III bodies which are 16 FPS (20 in liveview mode) and even with fast shutter speed, they won't always sustain this rate with erratically fast moving subjects and the difference is noticeable between my 200 f2, 300 f2.8, and 400 f2.8 primes compared to the still excellent 70-200 f2.8 and 200-400 integrated extender zoom lenses.  Primes are specialized and very good at doing what they do, zoom lenses are more complex and compromises have to be accepted.

Rodger

EOS 1DX M3, 1DX M2, 1DX, 5DS R, M6 Mark II, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video

View solution in original post

7 REPLIES 7

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

If you have older EF lenses that were initially released prior to 2009, then those lenses may exhibit degraded performance with the advanced AF and tracking features.

121FCC5A-5616-4446-9F3E-CF58A7055435.jpeg6621B945-2A60-43F7-AF43-58A04E60FE35.jpeg

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Well, that's a nice chart to have around! I believe my 70-200 isn't the IS iii. All I see on the end of mine is 1 : 2.8 L IS USM. 

Thanks a ton!

SG


@SamGruverPhoto wrote:

Well, that's a nice chart to have around! I believe my 70-200 isn't the IS iii. All I see on the end of mine is 1 : 2.8 L IS USM. 

Thanks a ton!

SG


Try disabling the advanced tracking features.  I would expect some older lenses to perform a little better with features such Eye AF disabled.

Following the introduction of the first camera bodies with Dual Pixel AF sensors, Canon re-released most of their L series lenses with IS

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Oh, yeah.  This table can be found in the R6 User Manual.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

I almost never run the AF tracking unless and that hasn't helped much. What do you think about just shooting moving subjects in the mirrorless electronic mode? Seems it shoots much faster, but I don't know if it will end up warping my photos. 

Example would be shooting a car race; I'm not moving but the subjects are moving very fast. Someone told me this "warp" could be an issue but when I tried, I didn't notice anything crazy. 

wq9nsc
Authority
Authority

Also realize that a fairly wide angle prime is going to have far faster focus behavior than a telephoto zoom regardless of its technological age.  

I shoot primarily with Canon 1DX III bodies which are 16 FPS (20 in liveview mode) and even with fast shutter speed, they won't always sustain this rate with erratically fast moving subjects and the difference is noticeable between my 200 f2, 300 f2.8, and 400 f2.8 primes compared to the still excellent 70-200 f2.8 and 200-400 integrated extender zoom lenses.  Primes are specialized and very good at doing what they do, zoom lenses are more complex and compromises have to be accepted.

Rodger

EOS 1DX M3, 1DX M2, 1DX, 5DS R, M6 Mark II, 1D M2, EOS 650 (film), many lenses, XF400 video

Totally agree primes will almost always be faster. I have considered switching to primes pretty heavily in the last couple of months, but almost feel like I would carry around too many because I would miss certain focal distances. I guess I could technically just pack what I think I'll need lol. I think it would be a bit difficult for action sports and motorsport. 

Any thoughts about other lens manufactures (Tamron, Sigma, etc). There's a price tag for new Canon L series glass that I can't afford quite yet so I have been toying with some other options. Curious if other makers new lenses will keep up with the AF and continuous speeds as well. 

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