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Printers require 300 dpi - A different question/issue about 72 dpi

writerinpjs
Contributor

Hello,

I've read through many of the threads on 300 ppi/dpi. I understand the solutions offered such as batch processing and how the printer will print the image size that equals the 300 dpi. However, I have a different issue. I purchased just this week a Rebel T5 with the assumption that I would be able to take 300 dpi images not 72. I create books for print and my printers require 300 dpi. They will not do the conversion. My options in the past have been film camera to CD (old, I know) or the iPhone. I was spending a lot of time in Photoshop getting the images to printer requirements. So imagine my dismay uploading the first batch of photos into Photoshop and seeing 72 dpi. Yes I was able to change them 300 - but this is exactly the production work I had hoped to not have by purchasing the new Rebel. 

 

There has got to be a better way?

 

Or is it a different digital camera I need to purchase?

 

Thank you for your help.

28 REPLIES 28

cicopo
Elite

You haven't read the old messages PROPERLY. Unless you're printing VERY big books. In Photoshop turn your RULERS on to see just how big the photo would print at 72 DPI. 72 DPI is just a useless message Photoshop has imbeded at a default.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

I have.

 

The issue is that my printer will not accept my files if they read 72 DPI no matter the size. 

I prefer to shoot in 300DPI to avoid having to batch process from 72 to 300 which is why I purchased the camera in the first place, for crisp 300 dpi images.

 

Can you help?

You CAN NOT set your camera to shoot in DPI's. It captures PIXELS. FORGET what Photoshop is telling you because it's not relavent. unless you've set your camera for very low quality jpg's. Set your camera to large fine jpg's & you can easily print high quality 12 X 18 prints. 

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

Okay - but again, an image that is 72 dpi goes into my document as that (though resized) - it gets saved as a high res print but the image still says 72 dpi and is rejected by my printer. I would like to be able to shoot prof. printable images that can be printed. 

 

Ideas?


@writerinpjs wrote:

Hello,

I've read through many of the threads on 300 ppi/dpi. I understand the solutions offered such as batch processing and how the printer will print the image size that equals the 300 dpi. However, I have a different issue. I purchased just this week a Rebel T5 with the assumption that I would be able to take 300 dpi images not 72. I create books for print and my printers require 300 dpi. They will not do the conversion. My options in the past have been film camera to CD (old, I know) or the iPhone. I was spending a lot of time in Photoshop getting the images to printer requirements. So imagine my dismay uploading the first batch of photos into Photoshop and seeing 72 dpi. Yes I was able to change them 300 - but this is exactly the production work I had hoped to not have by purchasing the new Rebel. 

 

There has got to be a better way?

 

Or is it a different digital camera I need to purchase?

 


It's that you (abetted by Photoshop) are reading too much into the term "dpi". The size of a digital photograph is measured in pixels, not inches. For a given pixel count, the picture will print smaller at 300 dpi than at 72 dpi, but will have, by definition, a correspondingly higher resolution. You start with a RAW image and crop it to the desired aspect ratio. Then you compute how many pixels you need in, say, the longer dimension, given the native resolution (e.g., 300 dpi) of the printer and the desired picture size (e.g., a length of 10 inches). Finally, you convert the image to JPEG, setting the number of pixels in the long dimension of the converted image to that computed number (e.g., 3000). Then when you print the image, things will come out right. What you describe above is Photoshop trying to do the calculation for you. But IMO, that usually just adds confusion. Work in pixels and you won't go wrong.

 

The calculation is different, though just as straightforward, if the printer differentiates "dots" from pixels. But I think most modern printers either don't make that distinction or do it behind the scenes, so that you can specify everything in pixels.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Are you working on your images in Photoshop and then saving them after selecting an IMAGE SIZE from the menus? This is what I'm asking.

 

Fullscreen capture 17122014 80845 AM.jpg

 

SEE the box for resolution, it's set at 300. IF I select 72 this is what happens to that file.

 

Fullscreen capture 17122014 81001 AM.jpg

 

If that's what you are doing it has nothing to do with the camera settings & is the result of not understanding Photoshop. Unless you like struggling along learning it on your own I suggest finding free tutorials on YouTube or paying for a 1 month membership to Lynda.com or another reputable on line learning site. That would be money well spent.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

Yes I know how to change the resolution. However, as the first post was discussing. I was hoping to not have to work through every photo through photoshop. Some of my images go straight to the printer. This is why I purchased this camera. To have professional grade high res. images. I'm still getting 72 and still have a problem unless I edit them in PS. I've had my art photographed in the past and all the images arrived to me in 300dpi from the photographer. He was using a digital camera. Maybe not a Canon Rebel. I'll find out what he used. I know he didn't take them through an image editor and manually change the resolution. 

 

Thank you for taking the time to answer.

Lets change directions. What size image files is your camera producing in PIXELS & the actual file size. Your manual will list the resolution (pixel dimensions) for the settings such as large fine jpg (the best setting for capturing fine detail) down to medium & then small. Your camera is more than capable of producing what you need. Something you have set or are doing in your software is WRONG, unless of course you're trying to print poster sized prints. .

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

Basically a 72 dpi image does not print well. I was trying to become more professional by purchasing a camera that produces a higher resolution/printer acceptable photo. All designers have this issue now with digital cameras. I thought it was just the camera phones. Now I'm learning it's also an issue with an expensive digital camera. I'll figure something out. Probably will need to edit every photo in Photoshop. An extra step.

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