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New member needs help

lurechunker
Enthusiast

I am new to the forum and asking for help. Our granddaughter plays basketball and I would like to photograph her. I kayak and would like to photograph birds. Is the EOS 760D the camera for me? Other? What lens or lenses? How can I protect my equipment form damage from saltwater? Thank you.

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS


@lurechunker wrote:
My 80D with 18-55 from Canon store will arrive tomorrow. I think I made a mistake by not getting the 28-135. Should I leave the 18-55 in the box and send it back? I'd like to start with an "all-round" lens and one long enough for back yard birds.

Do you mean 18-135, instead of 28-135?  The 18-135 lenses are pretty good.  BUT, they will likely cast a shadow when you try to use the flash.  I know that older 18-135mm lenses cast a major shadow on a T5, so I would expect a shadow on an 80D.  The 18-55mm lens has a 35mm equivalent of 29-88mm, which is pretty close to 24-70mm that is very popular for use with full frame camera bodies.

 

The  STM version of the 18-55mm is a really good lens.  I would hang on to it.  I can guarantee you that whatever plans you have for using the camera, you will find new scenarios to use it.  I would keep the 18-55mm, and pass on buying a 18-135, so that you can budget more money towards your birding lens.  If you can afford to do all of the above, then by all means, buy all of the lenses you want.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

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@lurechunker wrote:

What about buying a used or refurbished lens from B&H?


I am not sure if I have seen any Canon refurbished gear at B&H, not in the last few years for sure.  If you want to buy Canon refurbished gear, then I would only recommend the Canon refurbished store.  They will give you a one year warranty, not just a  "guarantee" of some kind.  

 

I think B&H has a fairly good and objective rating system for their used gear.  I think much of it is a bit pricey, though.  Many times they will offer used gear that is rated "good" that has an asking price that is more than what is being offered in the Canon Refurbished Store.  

 

Check what the B&H guarantee and return policy might be for used gear.  I've bought a used tripod head and a "hi-hat" tripod from B&H, and I think I had a 15 day return window, and a 30 day guarantee.

 

Good judgement needs to exercised when buying used gear.  You must consider the source.  You must consider the return policy, for which B&H has a good reputation.  You must consider the cost/benefit of expensive gear without a warranty.  You must consider can the used gear be repaired, if needed in the near future.  

 

With used camera gear, there is always a risk of mold and mildew contamination.  Canon's refurbished gear has that new gear smell to it, so I think the contamination risk is small to non-existent with Canon.

 

[EDIT]. If what you want is out of stock at the Canon Refurbished Store, be patient.  Most of the items will be back in stock in a month, or two, or three.  The "L" series lenses can sell out very quickly.  

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

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314 REPLIES 314


ebiggs1 wrote:

"Then you can take as many pictures as you like with pretty much any lens ..."

 

You don't do any bird photos do you Robert?  What about the birds that are traveling through? The migrants?  Why don't you give it a try, "with a modicum of telephoto", and I will use the suggested 400mil?


I guess I didn't make my point clear. When I said that, I was referring to birds that congregate at your feeder and are used to seeing you hanging around with your camera. For birds that eschew feeders and generally stay high, like many predatory and migratory birds, of course you need a long lens.

 

What I was driving at is that if you have a feeder, you don't have to hide in the distance and use a really long lens. Birds that frequent feeders quickly figure out who's a threat (cats, larger birds, etc.) and who isn't (photographers, especially those carrying bags of birdseed) and will usually allow you to get reasonably close.

 

The barber shop that I use has a bird feeder right outside its main window. Cars drive up and park two or three feet away. The birds are used to that and are completely unfazed.

 

When our kids were small, we had a pond out back that accommodated at least one family of wild ducks almost every summer. I've known them to come up and bang on the back door to remind the kids to bring them bread crusts.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

I got that Robert.  And it can work for the home bodies that set up residence but for the travelers like the Orioles, they don't know you ain't a threat.  If you are content with shooting the regulars, have at it.  We even have names of some of ours but it's more rewarding to see new ones come and go.  Don't you think?

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@ebiggs1 wrote:

"Then you can take as many pictures as you like with pretty much any lens ..."

 

You don't do any bird photos do you Robert?  What about the birds that are traveling through? The migrants?  Why don't you give it a try, "with a modicum of telephoto", and I will use the suggested 400mil?


I guess I didn't make my point clear. When I said that, I was referring to birds that congregate at your feeder and are used to seeing you hanging around with your camera. For birds that eschew feeders and generally stay high, like many predatory and migratory birds, of course you need a long lens.

 

What I was driving at is that if you have a feeder, you don't have to hide in the distance and use a really long lens. Birds that frequent feeders quickly figure out who's a threat (cats, larger birds, etc.) and who isn't (photographers, especially those carrying bags of birdseed) and will usually allow you to get reasonably close.

 

The barber shop that I use has a bird feeder right outside its main window. Cars drive up and park two or three feet away. The birds are used to that and are completely unfazed.

 

When our kids were small, we had a pond out back that accommodated at least one family of wild ducks almost every summer. I've known them to come up and bang on the back door to remind the kids to bring them bread crusts.


In my experience, that sort of, uh, domestication takes time.  Lots of time, spanning generations.  When I was young my we had a feeder in the backyard, which was mounted in an apple tree.  While it was about 20 feet from the house, it was also so high up off the ground that you need a  ladder to reach it and refill it.

 

Initially, birds were somewhat wary of it, especially with humans coming and going from the back door, which was over 30 feet away.  It was first mounted in the spring, but it took until mid-summer for birds to visit it, and then they took flight at the first sign of a human.  The birds were wrens.  The next spring we noticed a nest seemed to be nearby, because we heard young birds chirping.  And, it was during that summer that birds seemed to frequent the feeder more.  They kept coming until we had to cut down the apple tree because of its' age.  i was a good four stories tall when it was cut down.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Where can I get the best deal on a 80D? I am willing to buy refurbised if done by Canon.

 

John

Forum rules don't let us post businesses. Just Google "refurbished Canon 80D" and see what you get. Check the reviews on the business if its not one you are familiar and comfortable with.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, LR Classic

You can them in the refurbished section of the Canon online store.  That page is here:

 

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/cameras/refurbished-eos-digital-slr-cameras

 

The 80D is available in body-only or body+lens version in the refurbished store.

 

The refurb store price tends to be the best price you can find on the camera.  There are (unfortunately) some bait & switch scams that will advertise a price that seems too good to be true (because it is too good to be true).  So if you find a lower price than the refurbished store lists... you should exercise caution.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

I took your advice and ordered a 80D and a 18 x 200 IS from the refurb store. Already looking at a longer lens. They have a 75x300 that does not have IS. Thoughts?

Unlike some of the EF-S STM lenses, the 75-300 zooms are woth what they cost. Stay away from them.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, LR Classic


@lurechunker wrote:
I took your advice and ordered a 80D and a 18 x 200 IS from the refurb store. Already looking at a longer lens. They have a 75x300 that does not have IS. Thoughts?

18 x 200?? Is that a typo?

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

I ordered the 80D and the EF-S 18 - 200 mm f/3.5 - 5.6 IS.
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