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New member needs help

lurechunker
Enthusiast

I am new to the forum and asking for help. Our granddaughter plays basketball and I would like to photograph her. I kayak and would like to photograph birds. Is the EOS 760D the camera for me? Other? What lens or lenses? How can I protect my equipment form damage from saltwater? Thank you.

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS


@lurechunker wrote:
My 80D with 18-55 from Canon store will arrive tomorrow. I think I made a mistake by not getting the 28-135. Should I leave the 18-55 in the box and send it back? I'd like to start with an "all-round" lens and one long enough for back yard birds.

Do you mean 18-135, instead of 28-135?  The 18-135 lenses are pretty good.  BUT, they will likely cast a shadow when you try to use the flash.  I know that older 18-135mm lenses cast a major shadow on a T5, so I would expect a shadow on an 80D.  The 18-55mm lens has a 35mm equivalent of 29-88mm, which is pretty close to 24-70mm that is very popular for use with full frame camera bodies.

 

The  STM version of the 18-55mm is a really good lens.  I would hang on to it.  I can guarantee you that whatever plans you have for using the camera, you will find new scenarios to use it.  I would keep the 18-55mm, and pass on buying a 18-135, so that you can budget more money towards your birding lens.  If you can afford to do all of the above, then by all means, buy all of the lenses you want.

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@lurechunker wrote:

What about buying a used or refurbished lens from B&H?


I am not sure if I have seen any Canon refurbished gear at B&H, not in the last few years for sure.  If you want to buy Canon refurbished gear, then I would only recommend the Canon refurbished store.  They will give you a one year warranty, not just a  "guarantee" of some kind.  

 

I think B&H has a fairly good and objective rating system for their used gear.  I think much of it is a bit pricey, though.  Many times they will offer used gear that is rated "good" that has an asking price that is more than what is being offered in the Canon Refurbished Store.  

 

Check what the B&H guarantee and return policy might be for used gear.  I've bought a used tripod head and a "hi-hat" tripod from B&H, and I think I had a 15 day return window, and a 30 day guarantee.

 

Good judgement needs to exercised when buying used gear.  You must consider the source.  You must consider the return policy, for which B&H has a good reputation.  You must consider the cost/benefit of expensive gear without a warranty.  You must consider can the used gear be repaired, if needed in the near future.  

 

With used camera gear, there is always a risk of mold and mildew contamination.  Canon's refurbished gear has that new gear smell to it, so I think the contamination risk is small to non-existent with Canon.

 

[EDIT]. If what you want is out of stock at the Canon Refurbished Store, be patient.  Most of the items will be back in stock in a month, or two, or three.  The "L" series lenses can sell out very quickly.  

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

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314 REPLIES 314

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

Canon sells a fairly robust waterproof camera, PowerShot D30. As for lenses, what is your budget? Lenses can be costly.

The best lens to use to photograph indoor basketball is probably one of Canon's 70-200mm lenses, which assumes that you will be at, or near, court side.. There are other choices, but without knowing your relative location, any advice is pure speculation.

For photographing birds, especially birds in flight, the longer the focal length, the better. A super telephoto zoom lens with a maximum focal length of at least 400-600mm seems to be fairly popular. Beware of using focal length extenders, because there is often a price to pay for the benefit they afford.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend

My wife has taken her T6s (North American version of 760D) out in her kayak with no problems. She keeps it in a sealed waterproof pouch until it is needed, but we are in calm, inland lakes.

 

I would recommend you consider an 80D. It is weather sealed and faster all around for sports and BIF. Use a rain cover when shooting, keep a towel nearby and b careful. Saltwater is nasty.

 

I just started photographing my grandson on the basketball court and concur with the recommendaton of the 70-200mm lens.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, LR Classic

I would emphatically agree with the choice of the 80D.  The 80D is a Best Buy, IMHO.  I bought one for a relative, and he loves how it connects to his iPhone,  He can transfer photos, and remotely control the camera.  He's had it for a few months and has just now begun to discover the advanced auto-focus and video capabilities.  The 80D is an honest to goodness family camera.    

 

Water can be an especially nasty experience for a camera, and salt water is most particularly nasty.  I still recommend the inexpensive D30 in a small boat, in which you cannot or should not stand up.  Just because a camera body is declared to be "weather sealed" does not mean that it is "weather-proof."  In most cases, "weather sealed" means somewhat dust and water resistant, and only then for a short period of time, usually just long enough to wipe off drops of water if it gets splashed.  

 

Photographing birds reminds me of fishing.  It takes just as much luck as it does skill.  In my book, consistent luck is more properly known as skill.  Birding takes practice, and like fishing, requires some knowledge of the habits of your "prey".  You should figure on needing a fairly robust tripod for birding.  It ain't easy.  Like fishing, it takes patience and perseverance.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

"Is the EOS 760D the camera for me?"

 

No, it's not.  I agree the 80D is a better choice.  They 7D Mk II is even a better choice than the 80D.

 

"What lens or lenses?" "... granddaughter plays basketbal ..."

 

I also agree with the idea of the  EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM Lens.  However, depending on where you shot from, the most important part of shooting a granddaughter's basketball game, the  EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM Lens may be too long.  In that case add the EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Lens.  You will need a more 'normal' lens anyway.  Not gonna be cheap but she does this just once! Right?

 

"... would like to photograph birds."

 

You want the EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens.  If you consider price, this is the best 400mm lens made. Period. Also, it will be much easier to protect at the ocean.

 

"How can I protect my equipment form damage from saltwater?"

 

You probably can't !  I did say it wasn't gonna be cheap so you were warned.  Salt water is a death sentence.  But there are precautions you can take to lessen the danger.  Remember even the sea mist is bad.  Not just the water and time will take its toll.  Sand is also bad for cameras.  Key advice is, use common sense.

 

I have found myself in the enviable position, depending upon your opinion, of doing several shoots at the ocean.  I use large zip lock bags.

First all your lenses will need protective filters.  No debate, this is a requirement.  Cut a hole in the freezer zip lock bag and tape the filter in place.

Trace the filter with a permanent marker and cut out the hole so it's a bit smaller than the diameter of the filter. Then put the filter inside the bag and push the hole in the bag down over the filter so that the bag has to stretch a bit to fit around the filter. Use a strip of electrical tape to secure it.

 

Normally I offer people a secondary choice of lenses.  But the part about shooting in a salt water environment limits what is a good alternative.  I see none as the third world lenses are not very weather sealed.  And, I stress all your lenses will require a protective filter on them.  Not debatable!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Amidst all of the warnings, cautions, and suggestions on how to protect your camera and lens from water, one basic layer of protection has been overlooked.  You will need a protective filter on any lens that would be exposed to harsh conditions.  

 

If you are new to DSLRs, I still say the simplest and safest solution to protect your DSLR is use a PowerShot D30 waterproof camera.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

Amidst all of the warnings, cautions, and suggestions on how to protect your camera and lens from water, one basic layer of protection has been overlooked.  You will need a protective filter on any lens that would be exposed to harsh conditions.  

 

If you are new to DSLRs, I still say the simplest and safest solution to protect your DSLR is use a PowerShot D30 waterproof camera.


The major caveat with the PowerShot D30 is that you can swap lenses.  It's a waterproof point & shoot.  The built-in lens has a 35mm equivalent focal length of only 140mm.  An APS-C DSLR with a 600mm lens has a 35mm equivalent of 960mm.  Since the use case for the desired camera was to do some bird photography from the kayak, the 140mm focal length on the D30 would be like using an 88mm lens on an 80D or 7D II.  

 

I think you're right on the waterproofing being a nice feature -- but I suspect the focal length limitation would be inadequate for bird photography.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da


@TCampbell wrote:

@Waddizzle wrote:

Amidst all of the warnings, cautions, and suggestions on how to protect your camera and lens from water, one basic layer of protection has been overlooked.  You will need a protective filter on any lens that would be exposed to harsh conditions.  

 

If you are new to DSLRs, I still say the simplest and safest solution to protect your DSLR is use a PowerShot D30 waterproof camera.


The major caveat with the PowerShot D30 is that you can swap lenses.  It's a waterproof point & shoot.  The built-in lens has a 35mm equivalent focal length of only 140mm.  An APS-C DSLR with a 600mm lens has a 35mm equivalent of 960mm.  Since the use case for the desired camera was to do some bird photography from the kayak, the 140mm focal length on the D30 would be like using an 88mm lens on an 80D or 7D II.  

 

I think you're right on the waterproofing being a nice feature -- but I suspect the focal length limitation would be inadequate for bird photography.

 


If my remarks came across as using the D30 for birding, then that was unintentional.  I think the best solution is the 80D and the D30.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

"I think the best solution is the 80D and the D30."

 

The "best" solution is the 7D Mk II.  The others are a compromise that can work.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"I think the best solution is the 80D and the D30."

 

The "best" solution is the 7D Mk II.  The others are a compromise that can work.


That's the best solution for an experienced user, but not for someone new to DSLRs.

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"The right mouse button is your friend."
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