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Mixed Internal peripheral illumination/chromatic aberration correction

Antares86
Contributor

Dear all

 

I have a problem with batch-processing images from my recent trip. For some photos I had the camera-internal peripheral illumination + chromatic aberration correction turned on, while for others I have them turned off.

 

Is there a way to find out which have the said corrections and which have not, so that I can subsequently apply the corrections in Lightroom correctly to all my photos (and avoid applying it twice)?

 

thanks and best wishes

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

For a RAW image the camera doesn't modify the image; it applies a tag that Canon DPP can read to apply the corrections. Adobe softare can't read/apply the tag.

 

But when i have used Canon DPP and switched the corrections on/off an aeffect isn't always apparent because the lens may not have a significant issue that needs to be corrected.

 

I see this especially when using full-frame EF lenses on a crop sensor camera. The edges of the lens, where correction is needed more, are not being captured by the reduced field of view.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

View solution in original post

16 REPLIES 16

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend

If you are processing RAW images in Lightroom then the in-camera settings don't matter. They are only read by Canon DPP.

 

 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

I am currently trying to edit in Lightroom CC (to save time) and -a least from a quick first look - it seems that many of my images are already corrected.

Is it the same in LR CC?

Are you processing RAW or JPEG images?

 

https://forums.adobe.com/thread/2362401

 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

I am processing RAW.

For a RAW image the camera doesn't modify the image; it applies a tag that Canon DPP can read to apply the corrections. Adobe softare can't read/apply the tag.

 

But when i have used Canon DPP and switched the corrections on/off an aeffect isn't always apparent because the lens may not have a significant issue that needs to be corrected.

 

I see this especially when using full-frame EF lenses on a crop sensor camera. The edges of the lens, where correction is needed more, are not being captured by the reduced field of view.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

Thanks for clearing that up for me! 😊

Actually the answers are just partly correct.  In the case of raw files, thumbnails that are automatically generated by your camera tells Lightroom how to generate a thumbnail and preview based upon that thumbnail, or jpg image.  Lightrooms default settings will be applied later as the preview continues.  So in a way the in camera settings do effect what LR is importing.

 

The good thing about Raw files is the greater latitude of adjustments that can be made.  Not the fact they are influenced, or not, by the cameras settings.  The mere fact that you can view a Raw file suggests it was modified.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Don't get me wrong, the Raw file itself is not altered in any way just what you get to see is.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

Don't get me wrong, the Raw file itself is not altered in any way just what you get to see is.


That is temporary, until Lightroom generates its own preview file.

 

Try this experiment:

 

1. take a photo using RAW and the Monochrome Picture Style.

2. import into Lightroom    

3. the initial view in the Import window will be monochrome\

4. select Import

5. the file will be imported and once the LR preview generation ends the file will be in color

6. that's because LR will not read any in-camera applied settings

 

The only in-camera effect that will transfer to LR is Long Exposure Noise Removal. Tha's because the actual RAW file is modified in-camera the black frame noise signal is subtracted from the original image.

 

 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic
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