cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Long Exposure settings on T6

CraigPearson
Contributor

Help! I've been trying to do long exposure to get the bluring effect on running water. No matter what settings I enter into the manual mode all I get is pretty much a white image for anything longer than 0.5 seconds. I set the:
ISO to 100
Aperature to F32
Picture style: Standard
Ambience Priority: Auto
Auto Lighting: Standard

 

18-55mm lens

50-250mm lens

 

I've tried using a Hoya ND8 neutral density filter (helps a little but images are still way too washed out)
I've tried using a CPL filter at 90 degrees to the sun, no real improvement.

 

Any suggestions?
Can I stack two ND8 filters for a better picture, or will that create other problems?

16 REPLIES 16

Waddizzle
Legend

What shooting mode setting are you using on the mode dial on the top of the camera?  Use Av or Tv mode.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Manual mode (M)

 


@CraigPearson wrote:

Manual mode (M)

 


Hmm. Can you post a sample photo with the EXIF data included?  

 

With an f/32 aperture, your images should not be washed out with an ND 8 filter and a 0.5 shutter speed.  You really should not need such an extreme aperture setting.  A setting of f/8 to f/11 should be sufficient for most landscape shots.  Your shutter speed is fine, and ISO 100 is ideal for shooting landscapes from a tripod.

 

Are you using the viewfinder or Live View?  What is the exposure scale showing you before you take a shot?

 

Again, use Av or Tv mode.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

IMG_1999.JPG

That's the very best I could get


@CraigPearson wrote:

That's the very best I could get


Your best is actually pretty good.  Most photos have one challenge.  This shot has two challenges: capturing the water and capturing the dynamic range.  The fountain seems to be almost exactly what you wanted.  

 

A graduated filter could work on this scene, too.  In fact, it just might be the best and simplest solution.

 

A regular HDR sequence would take 3 exposures:  -1 Ev, 0 Ev, and +1 Ev.  The under exposure, -1 Ev, would capture the bright areas of a scene.  The over exposure, +1 Ev, would capture the dark ares of the scene.  The normal exposure, 0 Ev, would be used by the software as a baseline for combining elements of the other shots.

 

IMG_0039.JPG

 

That is an example of a HDR shot.  I did not use the typical -1,0,+1 sequence of exposures.  In fact, I very rarely use that typical sequence..  

 

In most HDR scenarios, the camera cannot capture the scene because it is not able to fully meter the scene properly.  I believe I used -2, -1, 0 for this shot.  I got an exposure lock on the ground in front of me, and used that as the baseline for the compensated shot sequence.

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Thank you everyone for your suggestions. You gave me more tools to work with. I was working with the premise that I could do it alone with just camera settings on a single shot. I guess multiple shots with photoshopping is the way to go. I was going crazy with isolating different camera settings and not getting the results I was hoping for.

 

Thanks! 

"I guess multiple shots with photoshopping is the way to go."

 

A more than working knowledge of Photoshop can overcome and create many different results.  Great shots come from post editing more so than just from the camera. Having three or more exposure settings make a fine start to edit in PS. The flowing water can be done without any special filters or multi-exposures with PS.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!


@CraigPearson wrote:

I was working with the premise that I could do it alone with just camera settings on a single shot. I guess multiple shots with photoshopping is the way to go.

 

Thanks! 


If your scene was more evenly lit, without the large brightly lit sky in the background and the darker walkway and fountain in the shadows in the foreground, you could likely get an acceptable shot from a single exposure.

If you can, shoot the same fountain again but move in closer, maybe angle the camera down some and keep the bright background out of the frame. If the lighting is fairly even across the remaining scene you should get something much closer to the desired results.

Announcements