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Just bought a T6i, with wireless and NFC, but the 2 Canon apps say it's not compatible?!

Fotoace
Apprentice
41 REPLIES 41

PajamaGuy
Enthusiast

Well....I have a T6s and the EOS manual says the T6's will NOT connect via WiFi (bummer).  So I fired a note to Canon.  Their reply:

 

The EOS Rebel T6s Wi-Fi feature currently allows wireless connection to another Camera, Smartphone, Printer, Media Player, or Web service.  While a feature to connect to a computer wirelessly with the EOS Rebel T6s is unavailable, you can still use the USB cable for downloading images and remote shooting using the EOS Utility software.

 

It DOES connect via USB, BUT you must disable the camera's WiFi first.

 

Since the WiFi does connect to smartphone via WiFi, I'm betting a software and/or firmware update fill fix the issue.

 

 

 

PJ
(Grampy)



"Photography is a money-sucking black hole, and I'm approaching the event horizon"

I just upgraded from a T1. The thing that pushed me over the edge was the wireless capability.

 

When I fired up the latest version of the EOS Utility I saw the option to connect via WIFI. So I went shopping and buying the T6 was a no brainer. I love these cameras, plus it has WiFi!

 

It never occurred to me that it wouldn't work. Why would you cripple a feature like that? I'm astonished.

 

Please Canon tell me that you will fix this in a firmware update.


@PajamaGuy wrote:

Well....I have a T6s and the EOS manual says the T6's will NOT connect via WiFi (bummer).  So I fired a note to Canon.  Their reply:

 

The EOS Rebel T6s Wi-Fi feature currently allows wireless connection to another Camera, Smartphone, Printer, Media Player, or Web service.  While a feature to connect to a computer wirelessly with the EOS Rebel T6s is unavailable, you can still use the USB cable for downloading images and remote shooting using the EOS Utility software.

 

It DOES connect via USB, BUT you must disable the camera's WiFi first.

 

Since the WiFi does connect to smartphone via WiFi, I'm betting a software and/or firmware update fill fix the issue.

 

 

 


Safe money says to bet that you're wrong.  In order for a device to connect wirelessly to another device, one of the devices must play the role of "wireless access point".  Your wireless router on a home LAN fulfills this role. 

 

Canon cameras and printers can connect through proprietary protocols, for which they even have a name for it.  Some smart phones [BUT NOT ALL] can connect to your camera, too.  A lot of cameras cannot  do it.  Ask yourself why not.  Every device in Canon's reply can serve as a wireless access point.  Most laptops and PCs with wireless capabilities do not serve as a wireless access point, mainly because they are designed to connect to one, not behave as one.

 

So, in order for a device to function as a wireless access point, then it requires the proper hardware being built into the package, which consumes SPACE, which is very limited inside of a tight camera body.  In other words, safe money says to bet against a software update being able to add on to the hardware inside of your camera body.

 

Just because a device says wireless, that does not mean that it is networkable.  Canon has used wireless flash units for years, which "connected" via infrared light, transmitted via line of sight.  ...  wireless and not networkable.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

I have just purchase the 750d and two len's and the flash to find you cannot connect to a computer via wireless, had I known I would have not purchased the kit. Evertything is wireless today - where has canon been during this period -they need to update the firmware.


@Waddizzle wrote:

@PajamaGuy wrote:

Well....I have a T6s and the EOS manual says the T6's will NOT connect via WiFi (bummer).  So I fired a note to Canon.  Their reply:

 

The EOS Rebel T6s Wi-Fi feature currently allows wireless connection to another Camera, Smartphone, Printer, Media Player, or Web service.  While a feature to connect to a computer wirelessly with the EOS Rebel T6s is unavailable, you can still use the USB cable for downloading images and remote shooting using the EOS Utility software.

 

It DOES connect via USB, BUT you must disable the camera's WiFi first.

 

Since the WiFi does connect to smartphone via WiFi, I'm betting a software and/or firmware update fill fix the issue.

 

 

 


Safe money says to bet that you're wrong.  In order for a device to connect wirelessly to another device, one of the devices must play the role of "wireless access point".  Your wireless router on a home LAN fulfills this role. 

 

Canon cameras and printers can connect through proprietary protocols, for which they even have a name for it.  Some smart phones [BUT NOT ALL] can connect to your camera, too.  A lot of cameras cannot  do it.  Ask yourself why not.  Every device in Canon's reply can serve as a wireless access point.  Most laptops and PCs with wireless capabilities do not serve as a wireless access point, mainly because they are designed to connect to one, not behave as one.

 

So, in order for a device to function as a wireless access point, then it requires the proper hardware being built into the package, which consumes SPACE, which is very limited inside of a tight camera body.  In other words, safe money says to bet against a software update being able to add on to the hardware inside of your camera body.

 

Just because a device says wireless, that does not mean that it is networkable.  Canon has used wireless flash units for years, which "connected" via infrared light, transmitted via line of sight.  ...  wireless and not networkable.


Either the camera or the device to which it talks (computer, phone, printer, ...) could be the access point, and an access point doesn't require any hardware that a wireless client doesn't have. Access points often function as switches or routers, but that's not a requirement; and it's the switching and routing functionality that requires the extra hardware. Everything else can be done in software or firmware. (It usually isn't, but that's an implementation choice.)

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Just because a device says wireless, that does not mean that it is networkable.  Canon has used wireless flash units for years, which "connected" via infrared light, transmitted via line of sight.  ...  wireless and not networkable.

 

You confuse "wireless" and "WiFi". Wireless means that a signal may be passed from one object to another. Although usually by radio signal, it could also be by two guys waving flags. As long as there is no wire connecting the devices, it is "wireless". The usual meaning though does include a radio signal between two devices. Wireless technology may be proprietary.

 

WiFi is a standard of radio communications that allows communication with diverse manufacturers and diverse products to understand each other. (see IEEE 802.11).  The standards for WIFI are set by industry for all to use (open standards) and are not proprietary. In order to use the WiFi Certified logo, the product must be capable of connecting to a network.

 

Canon is selling the T6, T6i, and T6s as WiFi Certified. Any reasonable person would expect to be able to connect another WiFi device through a router (network).


@Mr_Fusion wrote:

Just because a device says wireless, that does not mean that it is networkable.  Canon has used wireless flash units for years, which "connected" via infrared light, transmitted via line of sight.  ...  wireless and not networkable.

 

You confuse "wireless" and "WiFi". Wireless means that a signal may be passed from one object to another. Although usually by radio signal, it could also be by two guys waving flags. As long as there is no wire connecting the devices, it is "wireless". The usual meaning though does include a radio signal between two devices. Wireless technology may be proprietary.

 

WiFi is a standard of radio communications that allows communication with diverse manufacturers and diverse products to understand each other. (see IEEE 802.11).  The standards for WIFI are set by industry for all to use (open standards) and are not proprietary. In order to use the WiFi Certified logo, the product must be capable of connecting to a network.

 

Canon is selling the T6, T6i, and T6s as WiFi Certified. Any reasonable person would expect to be able to connect another WiFi device through a router (network).


You appear to be new to this rather old thread, and I wonder if you've read and understood the rest of it. You seem to be arguing like a lawyer, not a computer programmer. Do you know the difference between a WiFi client and a WiFi access point? Do you know what a router is and what role it plays in a network? Do you understand why those concepts make a difference in this context? If not, maybe you need to do some more reading. WiFi isn't as simple as camera manuals usually imply.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA



@RobertTheFat wrote:

 


You appear to be new to this rather old thread, and I wonder if you've read and understood the rest of it. You seem to be arguing like a lawyer, not a computer programmer. Do you know the difference between a WiFi client and a WiFi access point? Do you know what a router is and what role it plays in a network? Do you understand why those concepts make a difference in this context? If not, maybe you need to do some more reading. WiFi isn't as simple as camera manuals usually imply.


 

 

  It may be an old thread, but the issue is still there, Canon are still selling this and other models with a Wi-Fi certified logo and people are still buying it under the rightfull assumption that it will conect to other Wi-Fi certified equipment.  

 

  What does it matter if people dont understand the difference between this and that or the other and dont have a PHD in computer science.  It is what the advertisment suggests that is important.

 

  Now, I only in laymans terms know the difference between an acces point and a client, but as far as I can tell, the camera can act as both.  

 

  In a recent converstation with a guy at the Wi-Fi Alliance he states "  We do certify the devices for interoperability. These should connect to any Wi-Fi CERTIFIED device without question.

 

  So where is the confusuion Bob?  What should we know that we dont that would change how we should build our assumptions?  I`ve read the entire thread, it is only you who seems confused about this in my opinion.

 

 

Call it perseverance or help from that smart kid next door. I got my camera to connect through my router to my computer. I even d/l a couple of pictures. The downside is it is a battery drainer and went at about 350 kb/s. It took close to 15 seconds per picture.

 

On the camera i told it to find a network. I chose my network and entered the passcode for my router. On my computer I went to "This PC" in Win 10 and it was listed in the network alongside my printer and wife's computer. I opened the folder, went through the tree until I came to the open folder. From there I could open and view each picture. I opened two into Windows Photo Viewer and one into Paint.Net Slow down load but it worked. 

 

I don't think that this is what Canon Engineers were thinking of, but I did get it to work. As for being usable, it is a resounding NO.

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