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Highlight warning or zebra function for still photos

CaRa2
Apprentice

Is there or will there be a real time highlight warning or zebra stripe type function in the Canon EOS R line, specifically, the R6? I do have a real time histogram set up (for the same purpose) but have not yet mastered the ability to look at it in addition to the other settings when taking a photo quickly. I think the function exists for video.

15 REPLIES 15

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

There is a feature in your manual on P536 that discusses displaying a highlight alter when reviewing an image.  It does not apply when actually taking the photo because, as this is a mirrorless camera, the sensor displays what it will get in real time, so you should be able to see when you meter if something is blown out.  That was not the case with a DSLR unless one pressed the preview button.


cheers, TREVOR

Before you ask us, have you looked in the manual or on the Canon Support Site?
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

I not understand how the camera being mirrorless precludes it from showing zebra stripes live in still mode while showing them in movie mode. Also, my prior mirrorless, an Olympus, showed live zebra stripes in still mode. If they can do it why can't Canon?

P831 of the manual indicates that Zebras cannot be assigned as a function available for stills.  That is an issue you need to take up with Canon directly.  I am just trying to help you as part of the Canon user community. 

I am curious to know what kind of photography you are doing that requires such a feature - are you shooting in manual mode? I shoot landscapes, people, animals, and even some macro stuff with the R5 & R6, using single-point metering and it hasn't failed me yet.

 


cheers, TREVOR

Before you ask us, have you looked in the manual or on the Canon Support Site?
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Hello Trevor. I wasn't trying to be hard on you--my apologies. I like to expose to the right when I can; I find blinkies or zebra stripes much more useful than a histogram. I usually shoot in manual mode with auto ISO. I often photograph wildlife where I can't afford to review. I guess I do have a minor beef with Canon. Thanks for your response. 

No problem 🙂

I shoot mostly in Av mode - I have done most of my career, but can happily use manual when the occasion requires it.   I personally, find the R5 and R6 great because what I see in my EV indicates the degree of exposure, essentially WYSIWYG.  So, for me, that accurately tells me the degree of over/under exposure.  I have always thought of zebras as a feature of DSLRs where you don't see the result as you look though the viewfinder, so they are valid there.  Certainly, zebras are important for videographers and Canon have kept them for that application.

That said, if you think they are valuable, then I suggest you make the suggestion to Canon.


cheers, TREVOR

Before you ask us, have you looked in the manual or on the Canon Support Site?
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

I too love the mirrorless. That's why I defected from Canon to go to Olympus years ago. I'm glad to be back!

Thanks, Trevor. I admit, I'm a newbie. This (R6) is my first "real" camera; I never owned a DSLR. The other day, I took photos of a hawk flying above me against a bright blue sky, and the hawk was mostly white. Unfortunately, immediately prior to this, I had taken a photo of another, dark bird against the sky that had been backlit. I had increased the exposure compensation to lighten it up (shooting in manual mode with auto-ISO). So I over-exposed the white hawk. Had I noticed the histogram, I could have avoided doing this, but I was concentrating on getting the white hawk into my view and into focus. I could have reduced or underexposed the white bird by adjusting the exposure compensation accordingly. My thinking afterward was, if I had seen zebra stripes on the white hawk at that moment, I could have been reminded to adjust the exposure compensation. It's no big deal - just a lesson learned. I do have the histogram set up in my viewfinder, so I should use it... But I'm not sure how to see whether something is blown out in the viewfinder in real time when I meter it, as you say above. (I have my camera set to back-button focus, so I focus using the AF-start button and then press the shutter button.) Please let me know if I'm missing or misunderstanding something.

Tronhard
Elite
Elite

From Cara2's comments, it is a simple case of learning on the job  I have been shooting for a long time before DSLRs, MILCs and most of the other feature available in most cameras today.  My message is to you both to build your skill and not depend on technology to replace that.   Getting an over-exposure is part of the learning process and after a while one deals with those things automatically.  Certainly the nature of Mirrorless cameras to show you exposure in real time is an improvement and that should negate the need for zebras.  The R5 &6 (and similar models from other brands) are more prosumer models and many things that might appear in the lower end DSLRs (for example for Canon, the Rebels) like shooting modes: landscape, portraits, macros and zebras, are not present because the assumption is that users have the skills to manage the settings themselves.  I sympathize that it can be a steep learning curve if you are new to this kind of photography, but each time you shoot it's a learning experience and you gain from it.  At least you aren't paying for it for each shot like I did when I learnt in the days of film...


cheers, TREVOR

Before you ask us, have you looked in the manual or on the Canon Support Site?
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

This is a weird answer. Using this logic, we could still be focusing and guessing exposure manually, why depend on technology when we can just build a skill for it.

With a camera that provides live exposition preview, it makes sense to be able to see overexposition before taking the shot rather than taking the shot and then checking if there's overexposition (and eventually retaking, assuming we haven't missed the chance already). The feature is available for video, it's available in cameras of other brands. If R6 doesn't have it, fair enough. But trying to pretend it shouldn't have it, because the same result can be achieved in more complicated manner, isn't constructive.

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