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Higher Resolution/Too Many Pixels?

birdguy888
Apprentice

Hello! Could you help me with an odd question please? So I took pics of 2 friends who wanted to turn them into posters. The camera I used is the Rebel T6s (24.2MP) and the lens is the best I have which is a Sigma f/1.4. I shoot in .raw and I have the noise reduction in the camera set to high. ISO is 800 at 1/80 sec. They are inside a gym and the ceiling is gray. I used a Canon Speedlite 430EX II with a diffuser. I tried the straight flash and it blew them out. I cannot bounce the flash because of the gray ceiling which made them look horrible (the ceiling is also at least 25-30 feet high). I am also using a custom white balance, shooting a sheet of white paper they are holding. I use DPP to edit the pics and Photoshop. I reduced them down to 800 x 1200 as the originals are 4000 x 6000. The edited pics to me looked great and they loved them as well! They emailed the pics to the company but the guy emailed back saying this: “Does the photographer have higher resolution versions of these? They're good pics....they're just low resolution – Too many pixels.” The only thing I can think to do is lower the noise reduction in the camera as I've heard that having it set to high can cause graininess and possibly shoot at a lower ISO but then I'll have to slow down the shutter speed and if they move I have to worry about blur.....or do I send the full size, edited pics of 4000 x 6000 for a poster (posters are something I've never had to deal with)? I'm just at a loss of what to do in this case and I don't want to let my friends down! LOL Thanks for your input!

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend

The vendor's mis-statement is getting you confused. He shouldn't have said "too many pixels".

 

Send him the full size images processed just like the one you sent, since he said they were good pics.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

View solution in original post

Posters & large prints need the MAXIMUM file size you can produce, not lower.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

View solution in original post

4 REPLIES 4

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend

The vendor's mis-statement is getting you confused. He shouldn't have said "too many pixels".

 

Send him the full size images processed just like the one you sent, since he said they were good pics.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

Posters & large prints need the MAXIMUM file size you can produce, not lower.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."

Ahh, excellent....thank you so much for the help!!!!

ScottyP
Authority

What the others said is correct.

 

I would also add that if you do intend to do poster sized prints in the future, I would try to avoid high ISO settings and stick with ISO 100 or ISO 200 if you possibly can.  That could mean picking a brighter location than the gym.  The higher ISO's don't just make noise, they also reduce resolution.  Noise reduction further reduces the resolution, but it was already lower at ISO 800 than at ISO 100 at the moment of capture.

Scott

Canon 5d mk 4, Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?
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