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EOS M50 Pics Are Too Dark

Far-Out-Dude
Rising Star
Rising Star

First off let me say I am not a noob at this, I understand the settings and I have read the manual. It is also doing this with all lenses and the camera was just repair by Canon not long ago and has not been used much as I had foot surgery in Sept. foot got infected and I almost lost the foot so I have not been out photographing much.

Now for some reasons lately in Manual mode my pictures are turned out very dark unless I go all the way down to 4" which is much to slow for what I am trying to shoot and it is of course causing a blurred effect. I would normally take this picture at 1200 FPS when not on a tripod but when I try to do that the picture is jet black. Settings for this are as follows.  Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens 400mm f5.6 1/200 ISO 100 No flash. I had lighting set for an overcast day. I am hoping it is just something I am forgetting because I have not been shooting much and not a problem with the lens.

Oh I put it in Aperture mode and the pictures are bright enough but it is setting ISO to 6400 every time. I have tried to reset the camera but it does not seem to be resetting as BBF is still on after I have reset the camera. I had lens brace against window of truck though not entirely steady as I could not reach the pool noodle I normally put on window and only had it on the light camera skin. Thank you for any help given.

One thing I realized I forgot to mention when I was laying in bed is if I push the shutter button halfway down everything will get brighter for just a second and then look dark again in the screen and the viewfinder.

 

 

IMG_1364resized.jpg

61 REPLIES 61

rs-eos
Elite
Elite

The Sunny Sixteen rule states that you can be at f/16, 1/100 s and ISO 100 on a sunny day.  Or f/11 or f/8 on slightly overcast to overcast days.

So being overcast, opening up to f/5.6, but then using a faster shutter of 1/200s should produce a relatively good exposure.  Same exposure as when using f/8, 1/100 s for overcast days.

Do you happen to have an ND (neutral density) filter attached to your lens?

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers

Quite literally double checked the filter after I posted this, just the Canon Protect Filter. I have always been taught that when handheld or on not the best stabilizing platform to use three times the millimeter in speed to overcome handshake. I was on the car window but it was not the most steady so I had gone ahead and tried 1/1200 (Which I have always used in the past when handheld with this lens in the past) but it was much to dark so I lowered it to the settings shown. Thank you for the reply, I do appreciate it as well as any further help.

Far-Out-Dude,

Running your camera at 1/1200 will give you dark pictures, unless you compensate for it with another setting.

You said you put your camera in Av mode, but you didn't say what aperture that was, only that your ISO was consistently high at 6400. If you are running your camera at real fast shutter speeds, the camera will set a high ISO to compensate.

Try doing as ebiggs has suggested, and set your shutter speed at 1 divided by whatever focal length you are using at the time (1/100 for 100mm focal length, or 1/400 for 400mm focal length, etc.)

If you are in Tv mode, the camera will set an appropriate aperture.

Try not resting your camera on the window sill. The the jitters, bangs and potholes of the roadway are going to throw everything off.

You can also do as he suggested, and put your camera in P mode for a little while. Go out and take a handful of pictures in various lighting situations. Jot down what settings your camera chose for bright, sunny conditions and for overcast conditions. That might give you a feel for what settings you might choose in the future for yourself in Manual mode.

Steve Thomas

Very sorry about the delay in replying to each of you, life kind of got in the way and then to be honest I laid down for a bit as I have not been feeling well and I was falling asleep sitting in the recliner.

Okay first thing I would like to let you know is that the truck was stopped and I was the only one in it, I would never set any part of my camera on the window if it was moving, it is also resting on the portion that was thickest and was covered by a Lenscoat as not to put any scratches or dings in it. Normally I use what is called a poll noodle but I was able to get to it, it is a much thicker piece of foam that you see many kids swimming with, I split it down the center and put it on the window to help with movement and vibration.

Aperture was set to 5.6 or 4.5 I do not remember which is highest on that lens as they would allow in the most light and even then it would set to 6400 ISO

As to the last part about choosing settings I had never had a problem going 3 times the focal length with speed before, it is just something that started in the last week and again it did not matter what lens I would use while in manual which is what I have been shooting for close to a year now, that is why I am perplexed asto why it is doing this now. I will try the suggestion, I still have a lot to learn and am not so arrogant as to think I know it all.

 

 

To me the image is overall under-exposed.  Is it possible you had exposure compensation activated with one or two stops of negative compensation?
It's very hard to gauge the exact settings from a reduced JPG file.  Did you shoot in RAW?  If so, can  you post a link via a dropbox or similar so we can see your exact settings please?

 


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

No, that is one odd thing, I always shoot in RAW with Jpeg but for some reason these were all Jpeg and I do not understand why.

When I shoot landscapes or on a tripod like when I am seriously shooting wildlife I try to always use exposure compensation, I did not with this series though.

That's odd... Did the camera return to RAW+JPG without further interaction by you, or did it remain in JPG mode?

 


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Remained in Jpeg. I have reset everything and have set it back to RAW and Jpeg I will be going out this morning, it has snowed so it will be brighter out and will take some pictures then with the Canon EF-S 18 55 macro 0.25m 0.8ft as well as the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM Lens, mostly with the second as I am hoping to get wildlife in the snow.

Now that Trevor mentions it, exposure compensation is quite plausible to explain what happened.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers
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