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EOS M50 Lens Filters

Obinna
Contributor
1.) So any recommendations for lens filters for the EOS M50?
2.) If I decide to buy online how do I know the right size ?
1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Obinna
Contributor

Thank  you guys so much for your responses, although, a lot of Polarizing responses,  Im not one who likes to edit that much. Im practising just shooting pictures and in Jpeg naturally. Editing takes time and I love my pictures are natural. 

 

I was just looking for ways to make my picture more crisp with my EOS M50 so I came accross this youtube video that mentioned filters. I'll walk into the stores and see if I can test any out and use my judgement. 

 

appreciate mucho you guys

 

 

View solution in original post

10 REPLIES 10

rs-eos
Elite

What lens do you have?

 

Somewhere on the lens (typically around the front face or even around the side near the front), you'll find a mark of ɸ along with a millimeter value.  e.g. ɸ72mm

 

If you have the EF-M 15-45mm IS STM Kit lens, the filter size would be ɸ49mm

 

Personally I use B+W filters.  Especially their XS-PRO line.   I use their clear filters for lens protection as well as neutral density (ND) and circular polarizer (CPL) filters.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend
The M50 does not usd any filters. The M60 is an interchangeable lens camera body. Filters are designed to fit onto lenses

There is very little to need to use filters with digital cameras. I would only recommend a high quality Clear filter. Every lens uses a different size.
--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Waddizzle, your reply is a bit confusing since you mention the M60.  The OP has the M50.  And, yes, the camera body wouldn't use filters.  Hence my first question above as to what lens is being used.  I then provided info on how to find the size as well as provided the M50 kit lens' size.

 

As to the usefulness of filters, that all depends.  Personally I use CPL and ND very often.   Wide aperture in bright sun? ND.  Long exposure? ND.   Prevent having to use high-speed sync with flashes? ND.  Then numerous scenarios where a CPL comes into play.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers

"Filters are designed to fit onto lenses"

 

And, filters are basically obsolete. Far better to learn how to post edit and shoot Raw format. A case can be made on certain protecto filters but only on lenses that warrant protection. I.E., it makes little since to put a $30 to $50 dollar protecto filter on a $100 dollar lens. Just run it as is and replace it if it becomes damaged. However, on a $1000 dollar "L" lens, it is a good idea.

 

Also, somewhat of a case can be made for NDs and polarizers. But a little case at that because some of what they do can still be done in a good post editor and some editing skills. Remember once you learn how to edit it is free and you are not bound by what a single filter can offer.. And, editing does not require you to carry any additional gear while shooting. No mounting and dismounting either.

 

Use filters and common sense wisely!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend
The reference to M60 was a typo. After all, there is not a camera with model number that I am aware of.

I feel filters are legacy gear from film days. UV filters totally unnecessary. CPL filters tend interfere with AF systems. ND filters are rapidly becoming obsolete because shutter speeds are approaching 1/32000.

Besides, post processing is highly selective and more accurate than any filter made.
--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Actually I would hope I could do a much better photo than that but whatever. Let me do a thoughtful set up taking the shot and with Photoshop I could do that without a polarizer filter.

 

Waddizle is correct.
I feel filters are legacy gear from film days. UV filters totally unnecessary. CPL filters tend interfere with AF systems. ND filters are rapidly becoming obsolete because shutter speeds are approaching 1/32000.

Besides, post processing is highly selective and more accurate than any filter made.

 

If somebody asked me whether I would prefer shooting with filters or just PS, PS would win 100% of the time. I have nothing against folks that love their filters more power to'em.  They are just not for me anymore and I no longer recommend people to use them.  Except protecto filters that is.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

To each his/her own.  ND and CPL filters are yet another tool in the tool box.  I also love Photoshop.  Another tool.

 

Time is also money.  So having a large toolbox is awesome since you have all kinds of tools to create your vision in the most streamlined fashion.

 

Everyone can have their own opinion of course.  But not knowing exactly what the OP intends to do with said filters, we cannot possibly figure out if filters is or is not the right/best tool.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers


@kvbarkley wrote:

Try to do this in photoshop:

Untitled.jpg

 

from 

http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/technical/polarizers.html

 


Not the shooting scenario tha most people cite as the reason for needing a CPL.  They think they need on to clean up skies.  

 

9DE09D37-B91F-4E1E-98B0-DA88CCF5F219.jpeg

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"The right mouse button is your friend."
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