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EOS 7D Mark II not focusing with Tamron and Tokina lenses

afenton
Contributor

Canon 7D MK2

Two holidays last year were 'ruined' by the results of my photos.

Used centre-weighted setting but with a couple of lenses the camera was obviously struggling to focus; one was a Tamron 70-20 and the other a Tokina AT-X 28-70. I've had Tamron check for faults with an inspection and test - they found no fault. I took some photos where the focus point in the viewfinder was just a single square in the centre; I think that these photos are the ones that were pretty awful, with no focus to speak of.

Any advice?

Thanks.

 

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

I can testify that the Tamron 70-200mm zoom doesn't just work OK but does a beautiful job on a 7 series camera. I used one, actually two of them, for years and the combo made me a lot of money. Focus issues and misfocus are almost always caused by the user and not the camera/lens combo. The first thing I would do is reset you 7D2 back to factory default6. The second thing I would is is make sure you are using One Shot and not Ai-servo which it sounds like you are. Ai-servo causes way more problems then it solves.

I, too, think you might be confusing metering with focusing at least in terms.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

View solution in original post

22 REPLIES 22

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Greetings,

If I noticed AF problems, I would likely change the AF method for the subjects and shooting conditions.  Worst case manual focus if I just couldn't get the camera and lenses to do what I needed them to.  The body should be as good as it ever was.  I do not have experience with tokina glass and my only experience with Tamron is from the 80's.  My preference would be Sigma between the 3 and I have owned plenty of their lenses.  Today I only shoot with Canon glass.      

The 7D2 is a very nice, high performing camera with an advanced focusing system for its day.  Same one thats in the 5D4.  This year it will turn 10.  I might consider semi-retiring it in favor of something more modern.  It would be a nice back up.  The AF performance and technology in Canon's latest body's is just superior.  It does not mean dump what you have, but any photographer will appreciate what todays cameras can offer over what has been a go to tried and true performer the last 10 yrs.

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.7.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10, 430EX III-RT ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8
~CarePaks Are Worth It

Actually the 7D Mark II has 65 AF points vs 61 AF Points that the 5D Mark III & 5D Mark IV have. But I would say the 7D series lineup of cameras were the best APS-C cameras that Canon offered for pros. Sadly a 7D Mark III wasn't released. But a mirrorless R7 was. But it has many features of the 90D compared to the 7D Mark II. The 7D Mark II wasn't really replaced by an equivalent R series camera. To the OP just because a lens says compatible with Canon EF Mount. Doesn't mean it's fully compatible. I've had older lenses that worked correctly on an older camera. But on a new body it wouldn't AF. Or it would have focus pulsing. Even have IS tug of war. 


-Demetrius

Current Gear: EOS 5D Mark IV, EF F/2.8 Trinity, EF 50mm F/1.8 STM, EF 85mm F/1.8 USM, 470EX-AI & 600EX II-RT

Retired Gear: EOS 40D

Thanks, Rick,

I know, looking back, that the problem was occurring, but instead of taking notice, trusted in the camera; I should have realised that the camera and lenses were struggling to focus (something I discussed with the UK's Tamron specialist) and made compensation for: shifted between focus AF methods and listen to my own bloody instincts! Alas, too late; a fortnight in Iceland and four weeks in the US and Canada - photographic memories ruined.

Cheers, Rick

P.S. Love your city and State!

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Demetrius,

Thank you kindly for correcting me, and welcome back.  🙂

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.7.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10, 430EX III-RT ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8
~CarePaks Are Worth It

Thanks Rick, I've been dealing with some things outside of the forum. But I'm back in action now.


-Demetrius

Current Gear: EOS 5D Mark IV, EF F/2.8 Trinity, EF 50mm F/1.8 STM, EF 85mm F/1.8 USM, 470EX-AI & 600EX II-RT

Retired Gear: EOS 40D

Waddizzle
Legend
Legend

“ Used centre-weighted setting but with a couple of lenses the camera was obviously struggling to focus; … “

Did you misspeak?  The term “center-weighted” is typically associated with a metering setting, not focusing modes or AF points.  Do not attempt to perform a firmware update/refresh on the camera.

Do you have any other lenses that you could test with the camera?  Preferably Canon lenses.  It would be unusual for an issue to impact two lenses at once, though.  So, test the camera with different lenses to see if it works properly.  

I suggest using the Green[A+] mode, Intelligent Auto, to test the camera.  Using automatic to test another lens takes your camera settings off the table.  It would also be a good idea to retest the Tamron lenses, too, in this shooting mode.

If the camera is functioning properly with other lenses, then there is most Ilikely some type of issue with lenses..  

Canon is not responsible for guaranteeing third party lenses that are designed, built, and repaired by others to be fully compatible with Canon camera bodies.  It is also possible that you lenses are 

It is also possible that your older lenses are beyond their service life and Tokina is not able to repair them.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Hiya, Waddizzle,

Thanks for the reply. I suppose it was a sort of mis-speak. The problem is, when trying to focus on something that is, overall, centre-weighted ("best suited for any image where your subject is in the centre of the frame, or even where the subject fills the majority of the scene"), the focusing goes somewhat haywire - squares all over the place, in trying to focus. The results, when this happens, are the ones that are awful - a two-inch screen doesn't show what a 24-inch monitor does!

One other thing worth mentioning is that, with the Tamron 70-200, it's always at the upper end of the length that the problems seem apparent; if I use my folder settings by focal length, the upper end is full of problems.I have had no problems whatsoever with my Canon 10-18 or 18-55.

Thanks again for the feedback. I am seriously considering changing my 7D, though I have many happy photographic memories from it.

Cheers

What do you mean by the focus goes haywire. So you don't have problems with your Canon lenses. When did you start using the Tamron and Tokina lenses. This sounds like a compatibility problem. You will need to contact the lens manufacturers not Canon to resolve the problem.


-Demetrius

Current Gear: EOS 5D Mark IV, EF F/2.8 Trinity, EF 50mm F/1.8 STM, EF 85mm F/1.8 USM, 470EX-AI & 600EX II-RT

Retired Gear: EOS 40D

When I half-press the shutter, the camera is trying to focus, but the focus squares (whatever) just leap about. Finally, a single, central focus square appears steady in the viewfinder, then I can press, but they're the ones I am having problems with. The Tamron seems to have the worst results at the 150-200 end.

I have had the Tamron 70-200 for a few years now, with not much in the way of problems. I have recently had it serviced and checked by Tamron's authorised repairer in the UK, Fixation, but they sent it back as working, with no problems.The Tokina has only been used the one time, over Christmas and New Year, with mixed results. I think the problem with the Tokina is linked to when I used a 1.6 teleconverter with it.

Thanks, Demetrius

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