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EOS 2000D Recommendations for rugby photos under artificial light

Taryn1
Apprentice
  • I desperately need help I purchased a cannon eos 2000d as my first camera for my son who plays rugby so that I could try and get some good sports shots , during the day my camera had been working fine but I have started trying to use it in the evening under false lights and nearly all photos are blurry. I have googled and tried changing the shutter speed I’m still learning but getting really frustrated this happens with both lenses any help literally for a beginner I don’t know anything about cameras Sorry and thank you in advance 
5 REPLIES 5

rs-eos
Elite
Elite

What specific lenses do you have? The front of the lens typically has all the revelant information.

Blurry images could be the result of the camera not getting enough light. And based upon what mode you're in, too slow of a shutter speed may be used.  However, even if you use Shutter Priority (Tv) mode, depending upon the lens you have, it may not be letting in much light during the evening games.  And thus the camera's ISO will need to be raised which will lead to noise.

Capturing photos in any low-light environment can be very challenging.  You will typically want a lens capable of at least f/2.8.  More modern cameras can also be very beneficial in that even at higher ISO values, the amount of noise will be less than older cameras using the same values.

--
Ricky

Camera: EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L
Lighting: Profoto Lights & Modifiers

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend

@Taryn1 wrote:
  • I desperately need help I purchased a cannon eos 2000d as my first camera for my son who plays rugby so that I could try and get some good sports shots , during the day my camera had been working fine but I have started trying to use it in the evening under false lights and nearly all photos are blurry. I have googled and tried changing the shutter speed I’m still learning but getting really frustrated this happens with both lenses any help literally for a beginner I don’t know anything about cameras Sorry and thank you in advance 

Can you post one or two of the files you are unhappy with in Dropbox or One Drive so we can assess your settings and the image?

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, LR Classic

Hi and welcome to the forum:

In addition to what my colleague has said, you have probably realized that using a dedicated camera is somewhat more complex than using something like a cell phone, but with some learning you can improve your skill level and give you the potential for significantly more capability.

Here are some links to material to check out to help you start on that journey:
A two-hour course to introduce you to the basics of photography by National Geographic photographer Chris Bray, he even uses Canon cameras to demonstrate.

Canon also has a site with a lot of training videos:
Canon EOS 101: Photo and Videography Basics | Canon U.S.A., Inc.
You can check out the overview of the series: 

I would definitely suggest watching the whole of the first video just to understand the terminology and the concepts and you can go to the Canon link and check out specific topics.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Trevor has posted some excellent links

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"The right mouse button is your friend."

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

The three most important things in sports photography are location, location and location. Where you shoot from!  Sidelines is good,  bleachers is bad.

Second most important thing is know the sport. If you don't know what is going on, you will never get good shots unless you are very lucky. So do you feel lucky or do you know rugby?

Keep in mind that all and any camera gear has its limitations. There are situations where nothing will work. That's just the way it is. Here is what I would do. Set Av mode and start with let's say f4, check your manual if you do not know how to set the lens. (you did not mention what lens you have)

So Av mode and our f4 will allow the camera to select the fastest SS it can for proper exposure. I would set Auto ISO and set a lower and upper limit you are good with (perhaps 200-3200+, etc.), again check the manual if you don't know how. Now very important use One Shot and not, ever use Ai-servo mode or modes. This is where beginners wind up with blurry shots so make sure you have One Shot and use only the center focus point, again manual if you need to. Now you can try these settings or you can go through all the confusing ideas above but do come back and let me know if and how well it works for you.

You see a lot of the time beginners begin to over think things especially when they are bombarded with all sorts of new strange info and videos about how to set up the camera or exposure triangles or whatever. When you get done you can look a the settings and learn which ones worked and hopefully not many that didn't work. But in either case you know what to do and what not to do.

Then your next step is to d/l DPP4 form Canon, it is free. It is a post editor utility that will automatically u/l your photos to your computer and let you do some edits. Editing is where its at. You will advance form jpeg to raw format, too.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!
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