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Canon T8I Setting for sharp fall foliage pictures

jburch921
Contributor

Hello Canon friends.

 

 I recently bought a new Canon T8i following the advice from some friends on this forum.  I will be traveling to Maine in a few days and I'm hoping to get the best possible pictures from my new Canon T8i camera as possible. 

 

I went from a Canon Rebel T-3 to this camera.  It's definately taking a little getting use too.  I see it has so many more creative options to chose from so it's a little over whelming. I'm just looking for some basic beautiful fall landscape pictures.

 

Does anyone have any basic recommendations for settings to take some crisp fall landscape pictures without it being more that I can handle as a new-be with this camera?

 

Thank you so much for any recommendations.

28 REPLIES 28

Start from scratch. Download the RAW files to your computer into a newly created folder 

 

Then use Canon DPP to open the files. 

You can't cut and paste a RAW file and turn it into a JPEG file. 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

jburch921
Contributor
I downloaded the SD card and the files are I the EOS Digit (F) dCMI 100CANON file. This is where they are automatically going. If I download a Canon DPP will I be able to load the files onto to Canon DPP file? I've been trying to get these files open for hours know. I had no idea shooting these pictures raw instead of jpeg would be such a headache.

Based on what you wrote I think you are looking at the camera SD card and not downloaded images.

 

Here is how my camera card shows up:

 

Screenshot 2021-10-20 072544.jpg

 

The DCIM folder is where the camera stores the images. 

Inside the DCIM folder there is a folder 100CANON

 

Screenshot 2021-10-20 072608.jpg

 

Inside that folder will be your image files. 

 

Screenshot 2021-10-20 072637.jpg

My folder is empty now, but if I had images they would be there.

 

How are you downloading the images?

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

"I had no idea shooting these pictures raw instead of jpeg would be such a headache."

 

It is not a headache. It isn't even hard to do. You just need a free from Canon editing software package that will do the job seamlessly. Go to the web site and d/l DPP4 for your camera. Click me!  You will have to have the serial number from the bottom of your camera.

 

dpp4.jpg

 

This is without doubt the best way to get the best pictures possible. It is light years better than jpg. However, if you choose not to, I have no idea why you would, but DPP4 will simply let you do that too. You don't need to get any MS add-ons or buy any other software. Canon has provided this for free.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Tronhard
Elite
Elite
If you are using windows 10 you can download a cr3 file conversion tool for ms. Is you do that you can see the files in a file manager preview window as well as photo viewer.

cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris


@Tronhard wrote:
If you are using windows 10 you can download a cr3 file conversion tool for ms. Is you do that you can see the files in a file manager preview window as well as photo viewer.

Hi. I think you may mean this product.

 

It doesn't convert .CR3 files but it will allow you to see the actual image and not the file icon.

 

Screenshot 2021-10-20 072854.jpg

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic


@jrhoffman75 wrote:

@Tronhard wrote:
If you are using windows 10 you can download a cr3 file conversion tool for ms. Is you do that you can see the files in a file manager preview window as well as photo viewer.

Hi. I think you may mean this product.

 

It doesn't convert .CR3 files but it will allow you to see the actual image and not the file icon.

 

Screenshot 2021-10-20 072854.jpg


Yes, that is what I meant.   Converting CR3 files is another issue.  I record images in both RAW and JPG format.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

All the great and fantastic photos that you see and love go through some post editing process. It can be as easy or as difficult as you want it. Basic color balance and levels control along with a white balance adjustment are all you usually need. And, it will make a world of difference.

 

You ask, why not just use jpg and do the same? The big difference is how the jpg is created. First you know that a Raw file is not viewable as you have discovered. It must be converted to some other format. Raw is just that, the raw data. A simple seires of ones and zeros. 

 

All cameras shoot Raw! No matter what you tell it to do, it shoots Raw and at full resolution. Each and every time. The big difference is when you tell it you want a jpg. The camera then decides what is good data and what is not good data. It then deletes all that info from the Raw file. Gone forever. It compresses it into a jpg at the size you selected, large, medium or small. Matter of fact whenever you simply save a jpg you lose more data. Now for another difference you never lose data from a Raw file. Edit it, ten times, save it, five times no data lose.

 

What this all means in a nutshell is you have way more latitide to do edits in a Raw file. And, if you choose not to edit it at all, you can do that too. Simply make a jpg out of it. Starting with a jpg in camera, you cannot go back to a Raw file!

 

111.jpg

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

All the great and fantastic photos that you see and love go through some post editing process. It can be as easy or as difficult as you want it. Basic color balance and levels control along with a white balance adjustment are all you usually need. And, it will make a world of difference.

 

You ask, why not just use jpg and do the same? The big difference is how the jpg is created. First you know that a Raw file is not viewable as you have discovered. It must be converted to some other format. Raw is just that, the raw data. A simple seires of ones and zeros. 

 

All cameras shoot Raw! No matter what you tell it to do, it shoots Raw and at full resolution. Each and every time. The big difference is when you tell it you want a jpg. The camera then decides what is good data and what is not good data. It then deletes all that info from the Raw file. Gone forever. It compresses it into a jpg at the size you selected, large, medium or small. Matter of fact whenever you simply save a jpg you lose more data. Now for another difference you never lose data from a Raw file. Edit it, ten times, save it, five times no data lose.

 

What this all means in a nutshell is you have way more latitide to do edits in a Raw file. And, if you choose not to edit it at all, you can do that too. Simply make a jpg out of it. Starting with a jpg in camera, you cannot go back to a Raw file!

 


Ernie is very correct here.  From what I see you are shooting RAW but not having loaded the post-production software to cope with that.  First, I suggest recording in BOTH RAW and JPG - storage is cheap, so until you master your post-production processes and technique you can, if necessary, work with the JPGs.  Keep your RAW images though, because as you get more adept at post production, you can revisit your RAW images and rework them


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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