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Canon T5i Shutter Issue??

kkola
Contributor

Hello, I just recently purchased a T5i Rebel. I was playing around with it and it sounded like there was something wrong with the shutter. It seems slow and maybe a little sluggish. If I hold down the shutter, it starts somewhat quick then quickly slows down the rate it takes pictures at. I'm not sure if this is how it should be or if there's something wrong with it. I attached a video. Someone please help. 

23 REPLIES 23

Tronhard
Authority

Welcome to the forum:

A question or two.  Does the shutter speed return to normal after being left alone for a while?

What are the specs for your memory card: capacity, speed, brand etc. Is it a full0-size SD card or a micro-SD card with an adapter?

My first observation is that the save light is active and then the LCD shows a busy display.  From that, my suspicion is that your storage card is very slow, or even faulty.

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

I attached a picture of the SD card. It is a micro-SD with an adapter. As for the shutter speed it pretty much stays the same. This microsd is a SDXC UHS-I which is 120GB and speeds up to 120MB/s.IMG_1283.JPG

and that is 120mb/s read speed 

Sorry you're having problems; but I'm inclined to agree that it's more likely the memory card than the actual shutter.  (Which is good news!).

Please bear in mind that the speed numbers printed on memory cards are garbage.  When it says "speeds up to 120MB/s", that means that they ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEE that it will NEVER go FASTER than 120 MB/s.  If that was worrying you, then I guess you're OK.  But it says nothing at all about how slow the card will usually go; and the difference can be huge.

A far better guide is to look at the SD card speed rating.  Now if you're only taking stills, this is less crucial; but a card with a U3, rating, for example, guarantees to store 30 MB/s at a minimum, sustained.  This is probably far faster than the card you have, and this should help you with continuous shooting.  A "v" rating is even more robust, though those are primarily designed for video.

HTH.

I'm relieved to hear it's most likely the SD card rather than the shutter. I am more of a stills shooter however I wanted to make sure the shutter was okay, I'm new to the camera world. After getting a new SD card the shutter seems better but still slows down in continuous shooting, which I'm not sure whether that's how it should be or not. 

Your camera has a process that converts your image to digital data, that happens at extremely high speed, but ANY card is relatively slow compared to the circuitry of the rest of the process. Consequently, the camera will slow down when it needs to write to the card.  To resolve this, cameras have a buffer: a unit of higher speed RAM that holds the data coming from the processor and feeds it to the card as fast as the card can handle.  All buffers have a specific limit and that means that after a certain number of continuous shots the buffer will fill up and then the system slows down to speed of the card.  This is what is likely happening to your system.

file storage path.jpg

On the bottom-right of your viewfinder there is usually a number, and that is the capacity of the buffer.  As you take rapid photos that number will reduce and as it heads to 0 the shutter slows down and may even stop.  The buffer will fill up faster with two things:

1. Writing both RAW and JPG files
2. Using the highest quality image size

Unless you are going to take long series of exposures rapidly, this should not be an issue.  Holding the shutter button down for extended periods will simple action this situation, but may not be how you will actually work.

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

Tronhard
Authority

Micro SD cards with adapters are not encouraged for Canon cameras because the adapters often give problems.  To eliminate the card from the issue, do you have a full-size SD card available you can try to use instead?

cheers Trevor

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri

Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

At the moment I do not. Tomorrow I will pick one up and hopefully it will solve the issue. I will get back to you once I am able to pick one up and test it out. 

Is there a certain speed or certain specs you recommend?

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