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Canon T1i Won't Take Pictures: Red Busy Indicator, Screen glitches

schaller2003
Contributor

I have a Rebel T1i. It focuses, and then when I snap the shutter button to take a picture it either 1) red busy indicator light comes on for 3-10 seconds then returns to the main screen, but no picture has been taken or 2) goes to a glitchy looking screen and stays there until I pop out the battery.

 

Ive tried switching AF to MF, switching picture taking modes, replacing sd card, formatting sd card, replacing battery, charging battery, taking lens off, all the contacts are clean looking. 

 

It does not happen inttermintently, one of those two things happen every time.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

schaller2003
Contributor

I've been in contact with Canon Tech Support. They say there is nothing I can do. It needs to come in for repairs. Or they offered my $30 for it through the Canon Loyalty Program. 

 

This is two Canon Rebels we've had, each lasting only about 4 years. I'm feeling like they ought to last longer than that under regular use (not professional). 

View solution in original post

9 REPLIES 9

Waddizzle
Legend

Have you tried resetting the camera?  Make sure your card isn't too large for the camera.  Avoid mini SD cards with adapters.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

I just found directions to reset. That didn't work. Do you think updating the firmware would help.

 

We have the same card we've used for years. Its not a mini SD. Thanks for you time and efforts.

Maybe it went bad, at the very least low-level format it in the camera. If that does not work, try a new one.

Sjoplin
Apprentice

Same exact thing has happend to my T2i and I have had no luck with figuring this out.  Any help you find i would love to know.  This stinks!

schaller2003
Contributor

I've been in contact with Canon Tech Support. They say there is nothing I can do. It needs to come in for repairs. Or they offered my $30 for it through the Canon Loyalty Program. 

 

This is two Canon Rebels we've had, each lasting only about 4 years. I'm feeling like they ought to last longer than that under regular use (not professional). 


@schaller2003 wrote:

I've been in contact with Canon Tech Support. They say there is nothing I can do. It needs to come in for repairs. Or they offered my $30 for it through the Canon Loyalty Program. 

 

This is two Canon Rebels we've had, each lasting only about 4 years. I'm feeling like they ought to last longer than that under regular use (not professional). 


Did you buy the camera new or used?  It was superseded by the T2i in 2010, six years ago. 

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Yes, we bought it refurbished through the Canon Loyalty Program. (I should have mentioned that).


@schaller2003 wrote:

I've been in contact with Canon Tech Support. They say there is nothing I can do. It needs to come in for repairs. Or they offered my $30 for it through the Canon Loyalty Program. 

 

This is two Canon Rebels we've had, each lasting only about 4 years. I'm feeling like they ought to last longer than that under regular use (not professional). 


Your frustration is understandable, but a lot is in how you look at it. If, for what you paid for your T1i (around $1000, probably), you had bought, say, a riding lawn mower, and five years later you had to spend two or three hundred dollars to have it repaired, you probably wouldn't feel cheated. But suppose that now a new lawn mower, updated with a lot of additional features and a more powerful engine, still cost $1000. You might feel foolish to pay to have the old mower repaired when a new, better one could be bought for a few hundred dollars more. Of course that scenario is unlikely, because the price of lawn mowers is pretty stable.

 

But consider the situation with digital cameras. Product improvement is rapid, and higher prices don't last long; so when you need a repair, the price seems high. Repair costs, which are mostly labor and can't be conveniently outsourced, don't fall much. But once you've paid for a repair, your camera, like the lawn mower, should last another five years. The fact that the repaired camera may now be obsolete is good, not bad, because you at least have the option to eschew the repair and buy a new, far better camera for not that much more money.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Thanks for your help, and everyone else's help in this post.
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