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Canon RP - Images look different even though taken right after another

gbiff1
Contributor
Help here:
I've been noticing from quite sometime that my camera produces images with alternances of light temperature in some parts of the photo. I put two photos that were taken one after another, and you can see that in one the left part is colder and in the next one is warmer. What can be that? White balance is set manually.
Canon RP +50mm RF, less than a year of use.WhatsApp Image 2024-04-28 at 17.57.10.jpegWhatsApp Image 2024-04-28 at 17.57.33.jpegWhatsApp Image 2024-04-28 at 17.57.48.jpeg
Canon RP + 50mm 1.8 RF
6 REPLIES 6

shadowsports
Legend
Legend

Greetings

I'm on my mobile device currently. Is the lighting florescent? 

What white balance is the camera using?

shadowsports_0-1714340543390.png

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.6.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100 Macro, ~RF 100~400, ~RF 100~500, +RF 1.4x TC, +Canon Control Ring, BG-R10, 430EX III-RT ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DaVinci Resolve ~Windows11 Pro ~ImageClass MF644Cdw/MF656Cdw ~Pixel 8
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p4pictures
Whiz
Whiz

AC powered light might change colour slightly due to the mains frequency, while it's normally the brightness it is sometimes the colour temperature. It could also be the brightness change of the light, the camera applying a bluer white balance to the scene, but less of a warm light from the lighting.

When you say the white balance is set manually, what does that mean?

Canon cameras have auto white balance and then several white balance presets such as tungsten, shade, cloudy and fluorescent, plus there is custom white balance and for some cameras kelvin white balance. 

Only when set to custom white balance or Kelvin will the same white balance be used across the whole frame.

When a preset like tungsten, shade, cloudy, fluorescent, daylight etc is used these have a little "wiggle room" and the camera can apply different white balance to different parts the image to make an overall pleasing image. Usually the difference is a few hundred Kelvin, but it might be enough for your images. I'm assuming these are JPG images from the camera, if they are RAW and processed in Canon DPP then you see similar, but when using say Adobe Lightroom they use a fixed colour temperature for the whole frame based on the temp and tint sliders.


Brian
EOS specialist trainer, photographer and author

Hi Brian.

"When a preset like tungsten, shade, cloudy, fluorescent, daylight etc is used these have a little "wiggle room" and the camera can apply different white balance to different parts the image to make an overall pleasing image."

Does this mean the camera is analyzing each of the matrix sensor segments and adjusting the white balance individually for each segment?

 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

Are you sure about that? Do you have anything from Canon talking about this? This would play havoc with anyone *intentionally* mixing light sources.

BurnUnit
Whiz
Whiz

Mixed lighting in a scene (flourescent, daylight, incandescent, speed light) might cause some color variations in shots like these. Some LED lighting can make for even more noticeable color shifts. The fact that these shots contain a lot of white and neutral grays probably magnifies the effect somewhat.

Tintype_18
Authority
Authority

Had the same problem with photos showing a "gold" hue. Professional photographer: Check your WB.

John
Canon EOS T7; EF-S 18-55mm IS; EF 28-135mm IS; EF 75-300mm; Sigma 150-600mm DG
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