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Canon 5D mk lll DEAD!

mitch236
Contributor

I posted this on the Facebook site but no replies.

 

Last while shooting my daughter's gymnastic event, first I realized I didn't have my Canon EF70-200f2.8 fully mounted to my 5D mklll and although it was working, eventually the focus stopped functioning and that's when I noticed it wasn't fully locked in. So now the lens is locked and finished the event and while downloading to my iPhone by EyFi card in the camera, my camera died! I freaked out and was losing it when I found a video on YouTube that explained that if I took the lens off, the battery out and the cf cards out, and then put it back together, it resets the camera and voila, it worked!! Has anyone else had this happen and how can I prevent it? Thanks!

 

Here's the video explaining the solution:

https://youtu.be/fqfDMikBKTA

24 REPLIES 24

I would think that the obvious way to prevent it from happening is to always make sure that your lens is properly attached. That has other benefits as well. We've had reports on this forum of cases when the lens fell off and broke because it wasn't properly attached or because the user loosened it by inadvertently pressing the release button while zooming or focusing.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Not to mention the variation of focus across the sensor since the lens is almost certainly not flush.

Yes, I certainly learned my lesson about not rushing to get the right lens on!!  Not to mention the chance of damaging the mount when rushing. 

 

Do you think the loose fitting mount could have caused my camera to die?  I'm really trying to understand why this happened to prevent future issues.

"Do not go to the elves for counsel, for they will say both 'yes' and 'no'"

 

I really don't know whether Canon's lens mount connections are designed to be "hot plugged" like USB. I assume they are since nowhere does Canon say that you have to be sure that the camera is off to change the lens.

 

That being said, I can think of a lot of things that can happen when an electrical circuit - especially ones connected to motors and coils - is is broken when the power is on.


@kvbarkley wrote:

"Do not go to the elves for counsel, for they will say both 'yes' and 'no'"

 

I really don't know whether Canon's lens mount connections are designed to be "hot plugged" like USB. I assume they are since nowhere does Canon say that you have to be sure that the camera is off to change the lens.

 

That being said, I can think of a lot of things that can happen when an electrical circuit - especially ones connected to motors and coils - is is broken when the power is on.


USB ports are not designed to be "hot plugges", which is why the icon appears on toolbars that you should click on in order to disconnect the associated USB device.

 

EOS_6D_Quick_Start_Guide.PNG

 

Canon may not say that you have to be sure the camera is off to change the lens.  They do tell you to turn the camera on AFTER you have attached a lens to the camera.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@Waddizzle wrote:

@kvbarkley wrote:

"Do not go to the elves for counsel, for they will say both 'yes' and 'no'"

 

I really don't know whether Canon's lens mount connections are designed to be "hot plugged" like USB. I assume they are since nowhere does Canon say that you have to be sure that the camera is off to change the lens.

 

That being said, I can think of a lot of things that can happen when an electrical circuit - especially ones connected to motors and coils - is is broken when the power is on.


USB ports are not designed to be "hot plugges", which is why the icon appears on toolbars that you should click on in order to disconnect the associated USB device.


That's not why that icon is there. It's to make sure that any buffered partial results are written to the device before it's removed. I've yet to encounter a USB-powered device that had to be turned off before being plugged in or removed.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

Besides, that isn't even what hot plugging means. After you dismount the USB device, you remove it, you do not turn off the computer.

 

And that diagram is the quickstart guide telling you how to first get your camera going. If you go to the lens only mounting/dis-mounting instructions it says nothing about the power on the camera at all.


@kvbarkley wrote:

Besides, that isn't even what hot plugging means. After you dismount the USB device, you remove it, you do not turn off the computer.

 

And that diagram is the quickstart guide telling you how to first get your camera going. If you go to the lens only mounting/dis-mounting instructions it says nothing about the power on the camera at all.


Hot plugging means connecting, or disconnecting, something when it is "hot", or live.   What does hot plugging mean to you?

 

Turning off the camera when attaching, or detaching, a lens is just plain common sense.  I have gotten into the habit to always turn off the IS and AF on the lens whenever I attach, or detach, a lens, too.  Sometimes, I do forget to turn off the camera, and sometimes I just simply don't take the time to do it.

 

You guys can do it your way, and I'll do it mine.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@Waddizzle wrote:

@kvbarkley wrote:

"Do not go to the elves for counsel, for they will say both 'yes' and 'no'"

 

I really don't know whether Canon's lens mount connections are designed to be "hot plugged" like USB. I assume they are since nowhere does Canon say that you have to be sure that the camera is off to change the lens.

 

That being said, I can think of a lot of things that can happen when an electrical circuit - especially ones connected to motors and coils - is is broken when the power is on.


USB ports are not designed to be "hot plugges", which is why the icon appears on toolbars that you should click on in order to disconnect the associated USB device.


That's not why that icon is there. It's to make sure that any buffered partial results are written to the device before it's removed. I've yet to encounter a USB-powered device that had to be turned off before being plugged in or removed.


Really?  So, why is it that the icon doesn't change its' appearance when the device is being accessed by the computer?  How would you know, or make sure, that any partially buffered results are fully written to the device?  You look at the USB device for an "activity" LED, or some other sort of indication, not an icon on the taskbar.

 

No, the icon is there to let you know that there is something connected, and to provide a shortcut for disconnecting it.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."
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