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7d vs more modern equivalent - iso/noise

bachi
Apprentice

I have a 7d mk1 which I often use in low light with that cheap 50mm 1.8 and a 24mm 1.4. It does well, but beyond a certain point i'm of course way up there with noise, mostly processing in black and white to make that noise more acceptable. I am also dealing with kinda slow focus and very narrow dof so i'm missing a fair amount of action shots (friend's wedding dancing the other day, for example)

so - I'm considering a new camera body, but i'm fairly happy with almost everything on the 7d, so weighing up whether it would be worth it for me.

I don't mind the cropped sensor and indeed am used to how my lenses are with it, but i'm not averse to switching, and even from dslr if it was better.

My main question is - will I notice a difference in my physical ability to take photos in low light? (can i can use a faster shutter and/or higher f without getting unusable noise), and can i expect any improvements in autofocus speed? (less hunting before the red beep in low light)

thanks!

6 REPLIES 6

Waddizzle
Legend

If you are looking for a new camera body, then you should consider MILC bodies.  They have MUCH improved ISO range and lower noise, including the very recently released APS-C sensor bodies.  I would recommend one of the MILC full frame bodies, if noise is your prime concern.

You have not posted sample images, nor described want exposure settings that you are using.  No one can really answer your specific questions about noise.  Of course, you will see an improvement.  We can only speculate as to what your expectations are. In the end only you can decide how much noise is too much for your tastes.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

I'm right there with Waddizzle.  The R7 or R10 with an RF18~150mm is a super combination for someone who is looking to step up from a 18MP 2009 body with 19AF points and 6400 native max ISO. If budget allows the R7 would be even greater.

Canon 7D vs Canon R10 Detailed Comparison (cameradecision.com)

Canon 7D vs Canon R7 Detailed Comparison (cameradecision.com)

My anaolgy for DSLR > MILC...  its like going from carburetor to fuel injection.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.2.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100~400, +Canon Control Ring

~6D2 (v1.1.1) Retiring ~EF Trinity, others ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~Windows10/11 Pro ~EVGA RTX 3080Ti FTW3 Ultra ~ImageClass MF644Cdw ~Pixel6 ~CarePaks Are Worth It

Lotus7
Rising Star

Totally seconding Waddizzle's comments, there are so many variables that it's impossible to be specific or to guess what, in your opinion, may or may not be a significant improvement. 

However, in my personal experience moving to the R and R5 resulted in noticeable, but not dramatic reductions in apparent noise.  I'd "guestimate" on the order of 1 to 1-1/2 stops for many situations.  However, the improvement in auto-focus capability in low light is much more substantial.  With comparable lens apertures I'm routinely seeing impressive 3 or even 4 stop improvements.

Returning to the high ISO noise issue, you might want to take a look at Topaz DeNoise AI.  IMHO, the capability of this (and other) artificial intelligence applications can be astounding in their ability to dramatically remove noise without any significant effect on image resolution unlike the simple spatial filtering algorithms incorporated in most image processors.

@Lotus7,

Yes indeed.  DxO PL Deep Prime in v5 and Deep Prime XD in v6 provides exceptional noise reduction in high ISO photos.  

~Rick
Bay Area - CA


~R5 C (1.0.2.1) ~RF Trinity, ~RF 100~400, +Canon Control Ring

~6D2 (v1.1.1) Retiring ~EF Trinity, others ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~Windows10/11 Pro ~EVGA RTX 3080Ti FTW3 Ultra ~ImageClass MF644Cdw ~Pixel6 ~CarePaks Are Worth It

Tronhard
Elite

Hi Bachi:

My esteemed colleagues have expressed both the issues for us providing a solution and the possibilities for where to go.   

I have the both the 7D and 7DII, and will first say that the 7DII was a significant improvement over the MkI version in its own right.  On top of that, Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Cameras (MILCs) have offered improvements in resolution, as well a significant upgrades in other ways: such as fast, silent focus.   These also include eye tracking for people, animals and people with goggles or in vehicles, try WYSIWYG in terms of a direct read-out of exposure from the sensor, rather than the optical view from a DSLR that is usually shown with the aperture fully open.  This is also IBIS - In-Body Image Stabilization which works with the new RF lenses' Optical Image Stabilization (OIS) to allow hand-held shooting in dim conditions that demand slower shutter speed.  That said, what you have mentioned is dynamic range and that has improved leaps and bounds over the original 7D as well.

Those are all features, but they only provide value when you associate them with benefits to you.  A benefit is something that will improve your shooting performance in some way that is relevant to you.   For example, most cameras have video features, but they will offer no benefit to you if you shoot only stills, so I would avoid a video-centric camera - which the R7 is not particularly.  You will get video features in any camera these days.

So, what I suggest you do is look at some reviews and see what others have discovered so far.   I am picky about what reviews I recommend, as some are there to sell cameras, or have agendas to push other brands, but I will suggest reviewing the following two links as well as following the references already provided to do your research.  Once that is done, if you are still not sure, I would recommend borrowing or renting a R7 for a few days to see how it performs for you. 

I note that to get the best results from the camera, it is best to get one of the RF or RF-S lenses. There are currently only two specific RF-S lenses but several modestly prices (but good performance) RF lenses.  While you can still use your old glass, it will be old and higher-pixel sensors tend to show any optical issues.  Also, the RF and RF-S lenses give you other features as well, such as combining OIS and IBIS and the nano-USM and STM motors of the new generation of glass provide super fast and silent focusing.

A crop-sensor will almost certainly be more prone to noise that a full-frame sensor, but you are getting a smaller, cheaper and lighter camera and you are used to that platform.

Here are the two links:
A video review of the R7 with some sample images comparing to other DSLRs

A very detailed review by Justin Abbott:

Going to a MILC will take a bit of getting used to, and you need to really invest some time to study the features to get the most out of the camera, but that would be true for any newer camera - they have come a long way from the 7D.


cheers, TREVOR

Before you ask us, have you looked in the manual or on the Canon Support Site?
"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Back in the day, I would have sat down with the camera manual to get an idea of the features and usage of a camera, and I would definitely recommend having a copy of the manual for reference (I download them as PDFs so I can use the search features). 

These days there are videos that go through the menus and options and they can be helpful in gauging the suitability of a body.  Here is one such video:

I hope all of this is of some help to you, but it may take a while to digest!


cheers, TREVOR

Before you ask us, have you looked in the manual or on the Canon Support Site?
"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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