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7D Mark II writes to wrong card

kitmos
Contributor

I bought a 7D mark II and have had an ongoing problem. I have it set to write to Card 1 (CF Card) first and when full to card 2 (SD Card). Several times I pulled the CF Card and put it in my computer but it was blank. When I put the SD card in the card reader my photos are on it. I sent it to Canon and they said there was nothing wrong with it. When I got it back I double checked the settings (correct) it was OK for awhile but then reverted back to writing to the sd card and ignoring the CF card. Having spent $30 to UPS it to them I'm reluctant spendvanother $30 to send it back again.

28 REPLIES 28


@kitmos wrote:

I'm talking to Canon now and he is able to duplicate the problem but says that is just the way it is. But I still maitain this is a really stupid design flaw in the 7d mkii firmware. 

I can't believe that no one else has complained about this.


Bob and I have polar opposite schools of thought on this issue.  From a user perspective, the issue is a legitimate, and  nagging inconvenience. If you properly remove a card, and then properly re-insert it, it seems like it should pick up where it left off.  But, that simple seeming behavior is really not quite so simple.

 

From a programmer's perspective, like myself, it makes perfect sense, because the camera should not ever make any assumptions about what your intentions are.  How is the camera to know that you re-inserted the same card?  The argument is made that which card that is re-inserted shouldn't matter.  But, the counter argument is the same, how is the camera to know that you intend the same behavior for the newly inserted card?  It forces you to confirm the desired behavior, completely ignoring the card until you do.

 

I think the firmware developers have simply "erred" on the side of safety, and not allowing the camera to be accidentally overwriting image files.  Besides, writing code that "figures out" what your intention are actually takes programming space away from the code to run the camera and produce images. 

 

Would you rather that they sacrifice performance for sake of an occasional convenience?

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Well so much for that theory. I just tried it with one of my 1 series cameras.  An action I never do normally, BTW, and it does not change cards.  It remains on the card I selected.  I still maintain, you should always turn the camera off before removing the card(s).

 

IMHO, the camera should honor your selection and keep it there.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

Well so much for that theory. I just tried it with one of my 1 series cameras.  An action I never do normally, BTW, and it does not change cards.  It remains on the card I selected.  I still maintain, you should always turn the camera off before removing the card(s).

 

IMHO, the camera should honor your selection and keep it there.


You're comparing apples to oranges, 1 series to 7 series. 

 

Like I said, it would consume additional memory in code to give the camera the smarts to do what may seem like a no brainer.  But, actually it requires more code because now the camera must accomodate at least two initial conditions when a card has just been inserted, instead of just one.

 

Like I said, and as you noted, it is not something that many people would normally do.  "The good of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend
Since the 1D series seem to do what folks want the code already exists.

It also seems strange that the higher level camera has a more foolproof system than a lower level device.
John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, LR Classic


@jrhoffman75 wrote:
Since the 1D series seem to do what folks want the code already exists.

It also seems strange that the higher level camera has a more foolproof system than a lower level device.

There is nothing strange about designing your product line so that the sales of the flagship products are not usurped by lesser big ticket models.  If you want the start of the art, intuitutive conveniences, there will be a price to pay. 

 

Am I saying that engineers will purposely cripple a model, so as not to hurt sales of a more expensive model? 

 

Yes, that is exactly what I am saying.  Don't blame the engineers.  There like the Steve Wozniaks of the world, let everybody have it for free.  Unfortunately, the bean counters, marketing, and sales conspire against such ideas.  PROFIT.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

Waddizzle,

I understand your point but hardly think Canon would bother to cripple a 7d Mark ii which sells for $1500 in order to sell more 1D's that sell for $4000-$6000.

 

Cheers, Kit

 


@kitmos wrote:

Waddizzle,

I understand your point but hardly think Canon would bother to cripple a 7d Mark ii which sells for $1500 in order to sell more 1D's that sell for $4000-$6000.

 

Cheers, Kit

 


Guess what?  That's how it works in the real world. 

 

Blame it on Sales and Marketing. The big ticket items need carrots that makes them more attractive over lower priced models.  If not, the lower price offerings will usurp sales of the big ticket items.  This applies to most any product, in any field.  Luxury cars have available heated seats, while economy models do not.

 

Whether or not this card issue was planned or unintentional is another story.  I am just saying that it requires more program code to implement the feature the way you want.  I have no idea how much program space is available in a DSLR, but I can guarantee you that if there is space available, then engineers will put it to use. 

 

If they 140 characters available to write a program, then they are going to cram as many bells and whistles into the space as they can.  It takes far less code to make the camera dumb, than to give it smarts. 

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

"Luxury cars have available heated seats, while economy models do not."

 

Our econo-box Ford Focus has heated seats!  Smiley Very Happy

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"Luxury cars have available heated seats, while economy models do not."

 

Our econo-box Ford Focus has heated seats!  Smiley Very Happy


LOL  Okay, granted.  Do you hve heated mirrors and wipers on your headlamps, too?  I think you know what I meant, though.

 

[Edit] 

Seriously, though.  The 7D Mark II came out how long ago?  At most software companies, the design team that created the original product is in charge of updates to that product.  At some point after release, that design team is rededicated to a new product.  They cannot sit around all day working on a product that has been the market for a couple of years.

 

In other words, it is highly likely that the design team may have been broken up by now, and no more firmware updates will be forthcoming, not unless some sort ofcatastrophic failure is uncovered, which it hasn't so far.  I think it likely that all of the known bugs may have been found and corrected, AS NEEDED.  That's how design engineers work, folks.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

"I think you know what I meant, though"

 

Sorry! Smiley Sad  But a lot of the time, I don't.    And, yes, it has heated mirrors. "Wipers on your headlamp", no.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!
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