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Will Canon "protect" lenses hurt image quality ?

mangurian
Enthusiast

Canon sells these and says they can be left on all the time.   Is this a high quality glass ?

 

Any info on how they effect image quality appreciated.

45 REPLIES 45


@Lumigraphics wrote:

With multiple lenses it can get awfully expensive to buy different sizes of filters, especially high quality filters, and this is a recommendation that wastes people's money.

 

US$76 for 77mm which three of my zooms use. So there is $228 for filters that are unneeded.


You are paying too much for filters.  I buy B+W 77mm Clear filters at B&H for much less.  

 

How often do you have to clean your lenses?  I would much rather clean a $50 filter than the prime element of a $2000 lens.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

You guys do what you will, this reminds me of DPR and the posterbators there. LMAO.

WHat does that mean?  Smiley Frustrated

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

WHat does that mean?  Smiley Frustrated



I fear we have not given the appropriate respect and obediance for this gentleman's obviously superior experience and common sense, gently administered as pearls of wisdom...   I am sure we will all miss his tolerant tone, incluse, and collegial approach to differing opinions and experiences.

 

In the meantime I think the rest of us lesser mortals can say that under many circumstances lens protection (be it by filter, hood or both) is may be worth the cost vs. the risks and if used appropriately should not pose an undue degradation of images.  That decision is, of course dependent on the situation each photographer finds themselves in.

 


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

I wonder how many folks here or any forum makes a living with their camera?  I know lots of folks make some money with it but there is a big difference in making a living with it. Your whole attitude and outlook changes.  The main most reason why new people fail is that they try to keep that hobby format to the, it's a real job situation.  It goes from cameras are fun to cameras are a tool. And if it don't you are in serious trouble.

 

Everybody that plays with a camera for a short while can tell you how to use it. Not a big deal. Some are pretty good, too.  However, it is a whole different ball game when it is your livelihood. It is also amazing how many become infallible in their ways after a short while with an expensive camera. It is an expensive camera so I must be good!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

... it is a whole different ball game when it is your livelihood. It is also amazing how many become infallible in their ways after a short while with an expensive camera. It is an expensive camera so I must be good!


I know what you mean.  To quote Percy W. Harris  "Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase."

 

That may sound odd coming from someone with so much gear, but I have never expected that it would make me a better photographer, I just like the tech, and sometimes it was a needed upgrade.

 

It's a matter of understanding the difference between features and benefits.  A feature is a characteristic of a product or service that it offers to any purchaser.   A benefit is specific to a person and is something that will offer to give an increase in performance or reduce a constraint to that performance.  People need to focus on the benefits they need and ignore the rest of the hype.  So many people argue the minutea of new releases as if they can really make a difference to their photography.  As Ansel Adams said, the six inches behind the lens are the most critical element...

 

So for me getting smaller lighter cameras has been helpful in overcoming my injuries when I could barely walk, let alone carry a heavy DSLR and big lens, but with the smaller lighter gear I could still take images and that was important to me.

 

The other day, in one of the camera groups that I engage with a newbie looked at my rather modest DSLR and telephoto and cooed that she was always impressed by a man with a big lens...  I wasn't too sure how to take that one! Smiley Wink

 

I just went out shooting and got a couple of shots I like with the humble EOS 650D and the 18-135mm lens.  I don't know if I could sell them, but I don't care any more, my values have morphed with my new reality.


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

"It's a matter of understanding the difference between features and benefits."

 

It is also a matter of the spreadsheet if you are in business.  How much will that new feature save me or make more for me.

 

" I don't know if I could sell them, ..."

 

Probably just a matter of marketing.

 

"... with the humble EOS 600D and the 18-135mm lens."

 

You do get some amazing results from your gear. I used to not think it possible, or lets say unlikely, so even us old dogs can learn.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"It's a matter of understanding the difference between features and benefits."

 

It is also a matter of the spreadsheet if you are in business.  How much will that new feature save me or make more for me.

 


Absolutely Ernie if it improves the bottom line that is a benefit - either by earning more or saving expenses or loss.  Benefits are ANYTHING that improves one's performance, be it in technical, artistic, personal or financial terms.  People often just buy the latest thing because it is new.  Sadly they forget that  the old gear worked just fine and often there is a drop in productivity as the new gear is understood and familiarity worked up.

 

Thank you for your kind thoughts.  I could not justify the gear if I didn't use it, and it reminds me to work on my skill not on my wish list!

 

This was taken at the steps inside the Auckland Museum.  I was walking down and blinded by the sunlight.  As I turned to go down the next flight I looked back (I always encourage my students to do that) and saw this.   I liked the interplay of light and dark at that precise moment, how the light was pretty much symmetrical at the top and bottom steps and the biggest shadow, cast by the window frame, sat neatly on the edge of a step.  Then there was the pattern of the marble.  A simple exercise in contrast and tone.

 

"All the technique in the world doesn’t compensate for the ability to notice"  Elliott Erwitt

IMG_0455.JPG

Nothing flash, but it made my eyes smile...


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris


@Tronhard wrote:

 

This was taken at the steps inside the Auckland Museum.  I was walking down and blinded by the sunlight.  As I turned to go down the next flight I looked back (I always encourage my students to do that) and saw this.   I liked the interplay of light and dark at that precise moment, how the light was pretty much symmetrical at the top and bottom steps and the biggest shadow, cast by the window frame, sat neatly on the edge of a step.  Then there was the pattern of the marble.  A simple exercise in contrast and tone.

 

"All the technique in the world doesn’t compensate for the ability to notice"  Elliott Erwitt

IMG_0455.JPG

Nothing flash, but it made my eyes smile...


Trevor, you are my kind of grabshooter. Very nice shot.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA


@RobertTheFat wrote:


Trevor, you are my kind of grabshooter. Very nice shot.


"Our duty is to experiment" Alexander Rodchencko

 

Thank you Bob, that's very generous! Smiley Embarassed


cheers, TREVOR

"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
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