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Tamron 18 - 400mm f/3.5 - 6.3 for the Eos 30D?

Saluki
Enthusiast

Came across a review for the Tamron 18 - 400mm f/3.5 - 6.3. With a range that wide, it seems it could be an "all-the-time" lens, pretty much eliminating the need for multiple lenses. My primary focus  birds and wildlife, thus the desire for the large tele. 

8 REPLIES 8

jrhoffman75
Legend
Legend

If your desire is BIF and wildlife you are going to want 300mm to 400m (or more).

The all-in-one teles are convenient but you pay a price in image quality. You are looking at a greater than 20:1 zoom range. 

If it was me I would look at the EF-S 18-135 lens for general use and the 70-300 (corrected typo) for wildlife and BIF.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, M200, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, Pixma TR8620a, Lr Classic

I must tend towards John's opinion in this.  I am not aware of any specific budget, so it is hard to suggest an economically acceptable solution.

Unless it is necessary for you to have only one lens, then there is limited benefit in using such a wide zoom range, when your actual interest lies in the long telephoto range.   The 18-135 STM or nano-USM variants are excellent, carry about lenses for when you are not specifically seeking distant subjects.

I would go with the Canon EF 70-300mm lens, (if John is referring to the Canon EF 100-300, to me that is too old and has been surpassed by the 70-300 units).

Depending upon what you do intend to invest, you could consider the Sigma 150-600 contemporary lens.   On you APS-C camera it will give you a Field of View of 240-960mm.  I have one and it is an excellent lens.  Apparently Tamron's version of this focal range is also good.

 


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Saluki
Enthusiast

Thank you both. Have been looking at the Canon 70-300. With the 18-135, that may be the ticket. 

Saluki
Enthusiast

Will start with the 18 - 135.  Ordered one this morning. 

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

Good choice. The EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Lens is a mostly under appreciated lens in the "kit" line up. It is a nice lens. I would still advise you to check out the EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Lens. It is no longer made so it is a used market situation but it is a very good buy used.

Avoid those extreme range zooms, IMHO, as always. The 30D could handle one of the 150-600mm super zooms very nicely, too. Also a good used candidate if cost is a priority.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Right there with you Ernie!

As to the super zooms.  I stated that I tend to shy away from them for the reasons we have all expressed, but I recently became the owner of a Fuji X-T4, and not wanting to splash out a lot of cash, I got the Canon EF- X mount adapter, and it allows me to use all my Canon glass on this body. 

I also learned that Tamron had made a 18-300 lens (on the Fuji that renders a FoV of 27-450mm)  for Fuji x-mount and Sony e-mount lenses and that it was amazingly good.  Intrigued, I researched EXTENSIVELY and even rented one for a short period and have to admit that Tamron have totally outdone themselves with this unit.  Weather 'sealed', IS that works with the X-t4 IBIS, but most critically of all, it has by far surpassed the performance of previous super wide-range zooms I have seen previously.   

So, I bought one and it has rendered some very acceptable images. Again: one must always consider the context: the need for a single-lens solution, the type and quality of output etc., but it looks like we may be within sight of another step forward in zoom optics for a certain market.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

Hi Ernie, my friend...  I hope you are staying safe and well! 😷
I am guessing you were responding to my post on the Tamron super zoom.  I appreciate the compliment, but have to say that my opinion was not based on my own photos alone but on reviews by those I respect: like Gordon Liang and Justin Abbott - who are not known for gushing about gear and who are not sponsored.  When I took that test shots, I did nothing exotic: just hand-holding and shooting through a range of focal lengths and apertures to see how it went.

I would still not recommend any such lens for high resolution Art, but for someone who is a hobbyist or even enthusiast, and who wants a single-lens solution it is an interesting development.  Still, that lens is for the Fuji or Sony systems, so not relevant here! 🙂  My comment was more apropos to the general trend in optics and potential for the future.

I think we are all pretty in agreement that in this case the 18-135mm is the way to go and then consider a longer reach - of which there are many options, as several of us have mentioned.

I can only reiterate to the OP that getting skills will be critical in improving their images: so studying on-line and through local institutions, or joining a photo club/society are good ways to connect with good developmental resources.


cheers, TREVOR

"The Amount of Misery expands to fill the space available"
"All the variety, all the charm, all the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris

ebiggs1
Legend
Legend

But you seem to get the best out of low end lenses that some or most of us can't!

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!
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