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Taking moon picture

Sanjaydesai
Enthusiast

I have Canon 6D camera. I am trying to take picture of full moon using EF 70 300 lens. Even at 300mm the picture of moon appreas to be very small. I know I need to use higher focal length but at 300mm the size of moon should be relatively large.

 

I do not know why this happens. can anyone tell me what is required to be done.

23 REPLIES 23

Mitsubishiman
Rising Star
Sorry, my bad f4. 5

I'm guessing it's one of the 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lenses.  At 400mm it's f/5.6 if wide-open.  Using a 2x it's f/11.

 

I wasn't following the math of how you got to 1280mm.

 

If you use an angular field of view calculator (there's one on this page:  http://www.tawbaware.com/maxlyons/calc.htm ) you'll find that if using an APS-C size sensor Canon camera (crop factor 1.6x) that a 1500mm lens has a .6° angle of view in the narrow direction.  At 1600mm it's .5 ... but since the moon can technically be just fractgionally larger than a half degree if it's at perigee, the moon would go right to the very edge of the frame with no room left.  So I tend to say 1500mm is the max if you want to fit the whole moon in the frame.

 

But that's on an APS-C camera...  the 5DSr is full-frame so there is no crop-factor (the crop-factor is 1.0).

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

Waddizzle
Legend

@Sanjaydesai wrote:

I have Canon 6D camera. I am trying to take picture of full moon using EF 70 300 lens. Even at 300mm the picture of moon appreas to be very small. I know I need to use higher focal length but at 300mm the size of moon should be relatively large.

 

I do not know why this happens. can anyone tell me what is required to be done.


While you may not have an expensive super telephoto lens, photographing the Moon is just one thing to photograph in the night sky.  You could also capture landscape scenes shot at night showing the stars.  It helps to find what is known as “dark sky” to photograph the stars.  

 

830E107F-F742-434D-AA05-2E5DC999E467.jpeg

 

I almost tossed this photo, until I turned out the lights in the room and looked at it.  The above photo was shot less than 20 miles from Times Square in NYC.  You can barely see any stars in the night sky in midtown Manhattan.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

I love these shots of the night sky.  Your shot has Perseus (the cluster of stars near the bottom just to the right of the tree is in the middle of Perseus and it's the "Alpha Persei Association" (an open cluster).  The brightest star in that cluster is Mirfak.  

 

It also has Cassiopeia, Pegasus, and Andromeda ... including the Andromeda Galaxy.  I actually do see the point of light in your photo which looks like a star, but is actually the bright core of the galaxy (you might be able to tease out more detail depending on your exposure).  

 

 

 

A tracking head is an inexpensive way to take much longer exposures ... these can capture enough light for nebulae to show up in the photos.  The popular models are the Sky Watcher "Star Adventurer" (they make two models) and the iOptron Sky Tracker (they also make two models).  They're around $300... $400 with all the trimmings.

 

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da


@TCampbell wrote:

I love these shots of the night sky.  Your shot has Perseus (the cluster of stars near the bottom just to the right of the tree is in the middle of Perseus and it's the "Alpha Persei Association" (an open cluster).  The brightest star in that cluster is Mirfak.  

 

It also has Cassiopeia, Pegasus, and Andromeda ... including the Andromeda Galaxy.  I actually do see the point of light in your photo which looks like a star, but is actually the bright core of the galaxy (you might be able to tease out more detail depending on your exposure).  

 

 

 

A tracking head is an inexpensive way to take much longer exposures ... these can capture enough light for nebulae to show up in the photos.  The popular models are the Sky Watcher "Star Adventurer" (they make two models) and the iOptron Sky Tracker (they also make two models).  They're around $300... $400 with all the trimmings.

 

 

 


Thanks, Tim.  it was a very clear sky in early December.  Air temperature was around 40 degrees F.  I think the camera was pointed SSE when I took this shot.  This was shot with a 6D and a Rokinon 14mm T3.1 Cinema lens.  I used my big video tripod because it was a little breezy that night, and that tripod is as steady as a tree trunk.

 

The tree is being lit up by a street light about 100 yards behind me.  I was surprised to see the tree, but I guess I should not have been.  I only took a few shots moving the camera to get around the tree.  

 

NYC was glowing in the lower portion of the sky, and was showing up in the shots.  I did not think I was getting good exposures, so I packed it in after about a few shots.  This shot is actually cropped to remove the glow from NYC.

 

[EDIT]. 

I have considered buying a tracking head, but I live in NYC.  I took the above shot during a visit to a relative.  Decent dark sky is at least 3 hour drive away from me.  I wish it were not so far away, because I would definitely take more exposures.

--------------------------------------------------------
"The right mouse button is your friend."

You can use a light pollution filter such as an Astronomik (that's the brand name) "CLS" filter (there's also a CLS-CCD version but you don't need the "-CCD" version.  It is designed for cameras with no IR filter.  Your camera has an IR filter so the "-CCD" version isn't needed).

 

These filters work by blocking the parts of the spectrum common to street lights such as Sodium & Mercury lights... but allow the other parts of the spectrum through.  By lucky chance... the emission wavelengths for deep-sky emission nebula don't coincide with the wavelengths of street lights.  So by filtering the street lights, you can greatly eliminate the light pollution.  I know astronomers who have observatories in urban skies and these filters (as well as narrowband filters) are the only way they can do any imaging at all.

 

There are lots of vendors who make light pollution filters, but the trick is that many of these 14mm lenses don't have filter threads (my Canon 14mm f/2.8L has a non-removable hood and no threads).  Astronomik makes a version (two versions, actually) of this filter that clip into the camera body (behind the lens).  They make a version for Canon APS-C cameras and another version for Canon full-frame cameras (they call that the EOS XL clip filter).  This means you can use the filtering regardless of what lens you use and/or if it has filter threads (that's a nice feature).  

 

One caveat is that if you use the Astronomik CLS "EOS Clip" on APS-C cameras, you must not attempt to mount a Canon EF-S lens.  The problem is that since an EF-S has a rear element that slightly protrudes into the camera body, it would hit the filter.  But you can use EF lenses with it.

 

Another caveat is that as cities begin to switch to LED street lights, those things have emission bands all across the spectrum and are not easily filtered out.  These light-pollution filters are really mostly for mercury & sodium lights.

 

You get moderately wonky color which will need some adjustment in post processing... but it does let you work around light pollution issues.  There are guys who just take lots of long exposures through the light pollution filter to capture the nebulae (nebulae don't glow in any colors that are blocked by the filter so they show in correct color) but the stars are full-spectrum.  Since stars are brighter, they just shoot a few extra frames to capture the stars (unfiltered) and then merge in post processing. PixInsight has a star-mask generation tool so we can grab the stars from the normal color image, but the nebulae from the filtered images ... and merge them.

 

These light pollution filters block a lot of light so you'll find you will need to stop down (they want you to use f/3 or above) and that means you have to use a tracking mount.  But once you use a tracking mount, time is no longer a problem... you can expose for as long as you need (even a 10 minute exposure is no problem if you have a good polar alignment.)

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

Check out Ken Rockwell's What's New page (Note: this will eventually be gone if you are reading this in a few months)

 

He uses an EOS-R, EOS-R to EOS adapter, a Cano 1.4x adapter, a Canon 2x adapter and a Sigma 60-600 lens for the equivalent of a 1680mm focal length.

On Ken’s page, he refers to the EOS R as being APS-C.  I found that confusing because the EOS R is a full-frame mirrorless body.  Where is the APS-C coming from?

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da

It has an APS-C "mode"

 

https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/products/details/cameras/eos-dslr-and-mirrorless-c...

 

"Whether you're purchasing your first EOS camera or your fifth, the EOS R camera is designed to integrate smoothly into existing EOS systems. Engineered to work seamlessly with RF lenses, it maintains complete compatibility with EF and EF-S lenses by using one of three optional Mount Adapters. When using EF-S lenses, the EOS R even crops automatically to reflect the APS-C sized sensor the lenses are designed for."

 

I don't know whether something in this bizarre setup forced APS-C, or whether he chose it.

Thanks ... I can see how that would make sense.  

 

 

An APS-C mode would mean you can use EF-S lenses without vignetting.  Since there's no issues with mirrors having enough clearance when using EF-S lenses... this mode likely exists to support EF-S lenses on a full-frame body.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
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