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Promaster UV Filter stuck on f2.8 16-35 III lens

shariargent
New Contributor

I’m using a promaster UV filter to protect my f2.8 16-35 III lens that I purchased a year ago. We’ve tried freezing, hairdryer, rubber band, using a small amount of sensor cleaner on a Q-tip around the filter to lens interface, we’ve tried it all! Still fused! What can be done to remove the filter? Help please!! I’ve converted my EOS R to IR and need to get this filter off to shoot Infrared!

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

shariargent
New Contributor

We finally got it!!  A combination of the wrench for the filter and a strap wrench to hold the barrel of the lens.  My husband held the lens in his lap with the strap wrench (used for changing filters on our reverse osmosis filter system) and the filter wrench on the filter.  He then stabilized the lens in his lap.  Turning the wrench and holding the strap wrench on the barrel of the lens, it finally gave way.  Many thanks to everyone for all the suggestions and help.  Take care when using the NISI system as I think this may have over tightened the filter in the first place.  After 30+ years, this is the first time I’ve had this issue, and hopefully the last!

 

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9 REPLIES 9

rs-eos
Reputable Contributor

You could try one of those filter removers (I see a Sensei brand at B&H).

For the future, you may want to look into filters that would be using different metals than what the lens filter threads would be using.  I personally use B+W brand filters which are brass.  While one can still over-tighten such filters, due to it being a different metal than the Aluminum lens parts, it won't bind as much.

--
Ricky

EOS 5D IV, EF 50mm f/1.2L, EF 135mm f/2L, 600EX-RT (x6), ST-E3-RT
EOS C70, RF 24-70 f/2.8L IS

kvbarkley
Honored Contributor

Worse comes to worse, use a center punch to break the glass and just leave the ring on. Removing the glass might even relieve the pressure enough to get the ring off.

Holding that one as a last effort… so worried about scratching the actual lens, but may be it in the end.  I have ordered the wrenches suggested in the first comment, waiting a few days for delivery.  

I do the same procedure that John does except I use one of these rubber dishwashing mats. Put it on your flat counter top and try it. The rubber mat grips a whole lot better than carpet. Sometimes you can get a firm grip on the filter with a chamois cloth used for washing and drying cars.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Edward1064
Frequent Contributor

Isopropyl alcohol (70% is fine) delivered on a Q-tip is worth a try. I have found it useful for brief lubrication.

What worked for me in that situation was to place the lens filter down on a carpet. Push down and turn. The carpet developed enough friction on the filter and didn't require effort to keep it from turning. The problem I had in trying to get the filter wrenches to work was that I needed to twist the filter and simultaneously keep the lens from turning.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X Mark III, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472, LR Classic

The wrenches arrive today or tomorrow, post is tough, after the wrenches, will try the above, with breaking the glass as last resort.  Have tried lubricants… this one is tough, it was a very expensive filter and for the 77 mm lenses, not a problems.  I’ve been using protective filters for 20+ years, and this is the first stubborn removal I’ve had.  I have to point a finger at the use of the NISI filter system where I left the UV filter in place, this may have over tightened the UV filter… Lesson learned, remove the protective filter when using the NISI system.  UGH!  It’s always learning with photography. I’ll let everyone know the outcome and hopefully not a scratched lens glass on this very expensive favorite lens!

Tintype_18
Super Contributor

 I carry a small square piece of rubber drawer liner in my backpack. Have had to use it a couple of times.

shariargent
New Contributor

We finally got it!!  A combination of the wrench for the filter and a strap wrench to hold the barrel of the lens.  My husband held the lens in his lap with the strap wrench (used for changing filters on our reverse osmosis filter system) and the filter wrench on the filter.  He then stabilized the lens in his lap.  Turning the wrench and holding the strap wrench on the barrel of the lens, it finally gave way.  Many thanks to everyone for all the suggestions and help.  Take care when using the NISI system as I think this may have over tightened the filter in the first place.  After 30+ years, this is the first time I’ve had this issue, and hopefully the last!