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Lenses or mounts

JaylinG1402
Apprentice

Hey guys, I have a Canon Eos Rebel T6i. I'm looking for a lens, mount, or something that will help get me really good macro shots. For things like small flowers, insects, ECT.

I'm also looking for a really good telephoto lens or like a lens mount/extender. I want to be able to take pictures of birds and stuff without scaring them away. I need a lens that can zoom in really far. I have a lens that goes to 300mm but it's not enough.

Any recommendations??? 

7 REPLIES 7

kvbarkley
VIP

If you can find one, the EF-S 60 mm Macro was good

IMG_3411.jpg

But the EF 100mm macro would be even better.

The EF-S 35 macro has cool lights, but it's working distance is *really* short.

For telephoto, the 150-600 mm lenses from Sigma and Tamron are good bets, with a slight nod to Sigma:

IMG_7764.jpgIMG_7732.jpg

These guys can be found in the above photo to give you an idea of the magnification.

Tronhard
Authority

I agree with my colleague below.  The Canon EF-S 60mm macro is a native lens for your camera body.  It has great optics and because of the crop sensor's characteristics, it has an effective Field of Capture equivalent to a 96mm lens. It is also a great portrait lens, with its 2.8 aperture.  The image below was taken with the EF-S 60 on a Canon 650D (Rebel t4i).

Tiny worlds-1.jpg


cheers, TREVOR

Professional photographer, engineer and educator since 1980

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

Tronhard
Authority

For the telephoto lens, there are quite a few out there. I agree that the 150-600 lenses from Tamron and Sigma would likely be the way to go for your camera.  On your camera body, their effective Field of Capture would be the equivalent of a 256-960mm lens on a full-frame camera.   I don't have the Tamron unit, but I have the Sigma 150-600 contemporary unit: my understanding is the two brands are roughly equivalent.

The images below were taken with a full-frame camera on a very windy (gale-force, actually) day.  The wind-surfer was about 400m away.  The first image is the full frame, not quite at maximum focal length.  It was shot hand-held and there is a lot of sea spray in the air between me and the subject.

Canon 5DIV, Sigma 150-600c@520mm, f/8, 1/1000sec, ISO-200Canon 5DIV, Sigma 150-600c@520mm, f/8, 1/1000sec, ISO-200

The test of a good lens (and sensor) is how it will behave if heavily cropped, the following image is the same shot cropped heavily to magnify the surfer and fill the frame
5d4-Muriwai 009b.jpg

For birds, these lenses are great, especially because they are relatively light with good image stabilization, so you can really get up close and personal with your subjects.
The following image was taken with the same lens, hand-held.  The 7DII has a same-sized sensor as your camera, and in this case the Field of Capture is 900mm equivalent on a Full-frame body.
Canon EOS 7DII, Sigma 150-600@562mm, f/7.1, 1/800sec, ISO-125Canon EOS 7DII, Sigma 150-600@562mm, f/7.1, 1/800sec, ISO-125


cheers, TREVOR

Professional photographer, engineer and educator since 1980

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me

You never mention a budget, so here is my favorite macro. The EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM. I am passionate about macro, so I've tried and own several macro lenses. This one has been with me since 2014 from Rebels to the R5 and 6 (with adaptor), so it's been quite the investment and best fits my needs by allowing me to put a bit of distance between me and my subjects (which are often easily spooked) from tiny insects to flowers. I shoot hand held for the most part, so I opted for the IS version. However, I now use the RF version on the R5 and 6. Here is a link to the Canon refurb store.

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ef-100mm-f-28l-macro-is-usm-refurbished?gclid=EAIaIQobChM...

My go to birding lens for DSLR's has been the EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM II, which I was also able to use on the R5 and 6 (with adapter). I now use the RF 100-500mm L on the R5 and 6. I do own the EF 1.4X extender for the 100-400, but seldom use it. Here is a link to the Canon refurb store.

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ef-100-400mm-f45-56l-is-ii-usm-refurbished?searchTerm=EF%...

These are top of the line lenses in their price range, and there is some sticker shock. But I will say both of these lenses were game changers for my photography.

Now, the kicker is... How long will you stay DSLR? It is a very exciting time for photographers as mirrorless (MILC) cameras and Canons line of RF lenses are just amazing. For me, the above mentioned lenses were investments that stayed with me through six DSLR's. IMHO, besides the photographer, glass is the ticket, and good lenses aren't cheap. Fortunately, I learned this early on.

"I want to be able to take pictures of birds and stuff without scaring them away."

On a side note: My approach to birding is stealth and patience. I don't use a long lens to bring distant birds closer, I use them to make closer birds fill my frame. I typically shoot birds from 30-50 feet away. I don't wear white or light/bright clothing, and I even use camo on my white L lenses, LOL!

Newton

 

ebiggs1
Legend

If you want the best wildlife photos there is no substitute for getting close. The closer the better with certain observations to safety of course.

I would also recommend one of the 150-600mm super zooms over the ef 100-400mm zoom. The two offerings from Sigma and Tamron are virtually interchangeable. Pick the one you like best or get the best price on. Buying today I would go for the Tamron. It is important for a lens like this having some weather sealing. The Tamron 150-600mm does offer some level of weather sealing.  The Sigma 150-600mm C is not weather sealed!

And, yes, I own both.

 

Thumbs up on the EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM.  Very nice lens.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

ebiggs1
Legend

"I have a lens that goes to 300mm but it's not enough."

 

This tells me you need to work on your technique.  Learn the habits of the creatures you want to photograph. Learn how to blend in so you don't scare them away. Good wildlife photography requires a lot of patience. Rarely do you just snap a shot and if you are not willing to put in the effort, no super zoom lens will help very much.

 

Although you didn't mention it. you need a good post editor. All great photos go through some form of post editing. Canon offers you the very good and capable DPP4. It is absolutely free for you to d/l.  You need to be using Raw file format in the T6i. Use DPP4 when you u/l to your computer a step you are probably already doing.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and several lenses!

Tronhard
Authority

Ernie has made several good points, but much depends on the environment within which you operate.  For my shots of birds in nesting areas, like the Australasian Gannet, I rarely go past 300mm, and for birds in the bush much the same is true.  However if one is dealing with birds in open country that are not tied to a nest, that produces different challenges.   If you have a decent lens (by which I don't mean the Canon EF 75-300 series), then keep that and use it, but none of the Canon 70-300 units will accept an extender.  So, if you need that extra reach, then you are looking at a unit such as we have suggested.


cheers, TREVOR

Professional photographer, engineer and educator since 1980

"All the beauty of life is made up of light and shadow", Leo Tolstoy;
"Skill in photography is acquired by practice and not by purchase" Percy W. Harris
"A good swordsman is more important than a good sword" Amit Kalantri
Technique will always Outlast Tech - Me
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