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Bird Photography & Canon 1100D

himaniv
Apprentice

Dear Friends,

 

Need a suggestion.. 

 

I have Canon EOS1100D camera with 55-250mm lense ( Macro 1.1m/3.6ft). 

 

I have recently started birding and I am loving it. However birds being too far off, it is becoming difficult to get good pics with this setups. 

 

Need suggestion on : 

1. If I upgrade lense and keep same base camera, is it good? 

2. Which Canon Lense should I go for ? 

3. Can I use Tele converter with current 250 mm lense ? as high end lenses are very heavy to carry during birding. 

 

Please suggest a good cost effective model for begining.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

15 REPLIES 15

"...some one said that 1100dwill not be Able to mount heavy lense .. is that correct?"

 

It is not correct. However, it is a warning because the Rebel line isn't as robust of a build as the more advanced bodies are.  You simply have to be aware of that and take appropriate precautions. You have to hold the combo, camera/lens, by the lens and not by the camera. All is well if you do so.

The good thing about buying the lens first is, it will transfer to a more advanced body if you so desire. Buy the lens. Use it, learn it.  If it still isn't where you want to be upgrade your Rebel.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!

Of course this is not a bird but it does demonstrate how distance plays in the equation.  I shot this coyote at approx. 100 feet with a 300mm lens. A coyote is about the size of a German Shepard dog.  This shot has also been  enlarged by 150%. So this demonstrates how a small bird is going to remain small unless you get very close and or use a big FL lens. Bottom line again, have a lot of FL and get as close as you can.

 

_OS18662-Edit.jpg

 

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@himaniv wrote:

Dear Friends,

 

Need a suggestion.. 

 

I have Canon EOS1100D camera with 55-250mm lense ( Macro 1.1m/3.6ft). 

 

I have recently started birding and I am loving it. However birds being too far off, it is becoming difficult to get good pics with this setups. 

 

Need suggestion on : 

1. If I upgrade lense and keep same base camera, is it good? 

2. Which Canon Lense should I go for ? 

3. Can I use Tele converter with current 250 mm lense ? as high end lenses are very heavy to carry during birding. 

 

Please suggest a good cost effective model for begining.

 

Thanks in advance.

 


I'm not sure you're asking the right questions at this stage. Birding is a demanding skill and requires fairly esoteric equipment to do it at an expert level. You want to guard against trying to learn too much at once. The best way to start is to attract some birds to practice on. Wild birds are notoriously shy, but you can befriend almost any bird if you're patient enough. Put out some bird feeders and wait for the birds to notice. Once they get used to you hanging around, you can use them to learn what works and what doesn't. Then as you venture into the wild, you'll be in a better position to understand what additional skills and equipment you'll need when you can't get close to your subjects. You've gotten a lot of good advice (and some contradictory advice) in this thread, and the best way to find out what works is to try it. If you start slow and work up, you'll be less likely to waste money on equipment that isn't quite what you need.

Bob
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

" If you start slow and work up, you'll be less likely to waste money on equipment that isn't quite what you need."

 

Absolutely.  Get the lens first, (Tamron 150-600mm G2 Smiley Happy) and see if you need to upgrade the camera later. Slow as you go is the key to not buying something that you won't or can't use.

EB
EOS 1DX and 1D Mk IV and less lenses then before!


@RobertTheFat wrote:

@himaniv wrote:

Dear Friends,

 

Need a suggestion.. 

 

I have Canon EOS1100D camera with 55-250mm lense ( Macro 1.1m/3.6ft). 

 

I have recently started birding and I am loving it. However birds being too far off, it is becoming difficult to get good pics with this setups. 

 

Need suggestion on : 

1. If I upgrade lense and keep same base camera, is it good? 

2. Which Canon Lense should I go for ? 

3. Can I use Tele converter with current 250 mm lense ? as high end lenses are very heavy to carry during birding. 

 

Please suggest a good cost effective model for begining.

 

Thanks in advance.

 


I'm not sure you're asking the right questions at this stage. Birding is a demanding skill and requires fairly esoteric equipment to do it at an expert level. You want to guard against trying to learn too much at once. The best way to start is to attract some birds to practice on. Wild birds are notoriously shy, but you can befriend almost any bird if you're patient enough. Put out some bird feeders and wait for the birds to notice. Once they get used to you hanging around, you can use them to learn what works and what doesn't. Then as you venture into the wild, you'll be in a better position to understand what additional skills and equipment you'll need when you can't get close to your subjects. You've gotten a lot of good advice (and some contradictory advice) in this thread, and the best way to find out what works is to try it. If you start slow and work up, you'll be less likely to waste money on equipment that isn't quite what you need.


I couldnt agree more.  I am lucky to live in an area with lots of warerfowl.  I put up a small blind in my back field and was able to get a number of photos.  A great place to learn my equipment.

2r9a0091_35488647552_o (2).jpg


@CaliforniaDream wrote:


I couldnt agree more.  I am lucky to live in an area with lots of warerfowl.  I put up a small blind in my back field and was able to get a number of photos.  A great place to learn my equipment.

2r9a0091_35488647552_o (2).jpg


 

GREAT CAPTURE!   Birding reminds me of fishing.  You need a good spot, patience, and keep it quiet.  If you are parked somewhere, having a camera support like a monopod or a tripod helps, too.

 

Strive to maintain a high shutter speed.  When I am shooting wildlife, I like to use a shutter that is 1/1600, or faster.  But, that is on a bright sunny day, and the subject is in the sun, though.

 

You will get your best results shooting in one of the Creative modes, like Tv, which allows you to prioritize shutter speed.  Others prefer Av mode, which allows you to prioritize the aperture setting.  I get the best results in Manual mode.

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