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Very Washed out pictures

leesher
Contributor

I have been trying to print up photos of our Grandson for his Baby book and the wall, and they are coming out horrible.  They are so faded and washed out, I can't even use them and I've done the deep cleaning, the check nozzles, the regular cleaning, and it hasn't changed. 

 

It also looks the same on regular paper as it does on photo paper, that doesnt' change anything.  I've searched and searched to find a way to stop this without finding anything to help with this. 

 

I'm attaching the photos, the one on the right is on reg paper, the one on the left is on glossy photo paper (yes, all the settings are as they should be, I've checked them several times).

 

Can anyone help?  I have a Canon MX 492 printer.

 

Thank youPRINTERPROBLEM.jpg

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Hi Leesher.  YOu have a different model of printer so if these screenshots look a bit different you should still have the same options tabs somewhere on yours.  Hopefully this pic I made is not too confusing.  Once you get to step 4, that is where you can find intensity and contrast settings.   (You have to cick on "maual" just before that page to enable custom settings.

 

See on the left side of pic for step 4, theres a preview screen.  change it to the portrait picture.  When you move the settings you can see how the color changes in that picture.  I suspect if you have too much orange, the red or yellow or both is too high. 

 

Just don't get too frustrated if it take many tests to get it right.  One used up ink cartridge is worth the price once you find the right settings for you.

 

 Canon printers are the best for photo printing in my opinion.  But they can be the most complicated too when it comes to tweaking the settings.  But that is because many professionals are using them and need those options.

 

When you do find the right settings, take a screen shot or write it down.  You dont want to have to repeat all this if you resintall or get a new computer! :))

 

canon settings.jpg

View solution in original post

Though it's generally cheaper to have your pics commercially printed, I still enjoy seeing a well made image come out of my own printer at home. It's kind of like having your own color darkroom at home. But like anything associated with photography there is a learning curve.

What you have to keep in mind is that your camera sees colors in one way, your monitor sees them in another way and your printer may try to interpret them in a third way. Since you mentioned using PSP for editing, this link from Corel shows a fairly simple explanation of what's involved.

http://www.corel.com/content/vpk/pspx_pspa6/PSPX_Color_Management.pdf

If you were doing editing for commercial printing you'd want to do the hardware calibration of your monitor and the hardware can be kind of spendy. But for making inkjet prints at home a software monitor profile will usually be sufficient. And you likely already have the software you need to create your monitor profile.

Beyond that you may also have to change some settings in your editing and printer preference menus so they'll know to use the newly generated monitor profile.

View solution in original post

14 REPLIES 14

bucktoof
Contributor

You can try to play with manual color adjustment settings under advanced printer options.

 

I had to use these custom settings with my MX922 to achieve maximum likeness.  I use "Glossy Photo Paper" for media type, and Standard print quality.  (im actually printing on normal paper though.

 

Captureprinter.JPG

 

I did a test with your picture.  Photo on left, default settings for "Photo Printing".  On the right, my custom settings. You can see an improvement.  You and I have different printer models but you should still be able to find custom settings that work for you.  Be prepared to waste some ink.  I would suggest scaling down your photo size to reduce ink used.  Looks like you have a contrast (too low) Intensity (too dark) set.  My custom settings above are set a little darker than normal (for other reasons)

 

printer test.jpg

 

Thank you, Bucktoof, I'll try what you said, and keep my fingers crossed.  The one you tried came out good.

 

Thanks for the advice.

ok, so this is the picture after resetting the colors.  It's still dark, and more orange, I'm going to try to play with the colors to get it right..hopefully.  That's on regular paper, so glossy may make it better, but it'll still be darkPicBetter.jpg

Bucktoof, how do I change the intensity and contrast on the printing? 

Hi Leesher.  YOu have a different model of printer so if these screenshots look a bit different you should still have the same options tabs somewhere on yours.  Hopefully this pic I made is not too confusing.  Once you get to step 4, that is where you can find intensity and contrast settings.   (You have to cick on "maual" just before that page to enable custom settings.

 

See on the left side of pic for step 4, theres a preview screen.  change it to the portrait picture.  When you move the settings you can see how the color changes in that picture.  I suspect if you have too much orange, the red or yellow or both is too high. 

 

Just don't get too frustrated if it take many tests to get it right.  One used up ink cartridge is worth the price once you find the right settings for you.

 

 Canon printers are the best for photo printing in my opinion.  But they can be the most complicated too when it comes to tweaking the settings.  But that is because many professionals are using them and need those options.

 

When you do find the right settings, take a screen shot or write it down.  You dont want to have to repeat all this if you resintall or get a new computer! :))

 

canon settings.jpg

You just saved my printer, thank you so much Bucktoof, you are a true Christmas Angel.  I hope you have an amazing rest of the holidays, and thank you more than I can say.

 

END RESULT.jpg

Though it's generally cheaper to have your pics commercially printed, I still enjoy seeing a well made image come out of my own printer at home. It's kind of like having your own color darkroom at home. But like anything associated with photography there is a learning curve.

What you have to keep in mind is that your camera sees colors in one way, your monitor sees them in another way and your printer may try to interpret them in a third way. Since you mentioned using PSP for editing, this link from Corel shows a fairly simple explanation of what's involved.

http://www.corel.com/content/vpk/pspx_pspa6/PSPX_Color_Management.pdf

If you were doing editing for commercial printing you'd want to do the hardware calibration of your monitor and the hardware can be kind of spendy. But for making inkjet prints at home a software monitor profile will usually be sufficient. And you likely already have the software you need to create your monitor profile.

Beyond that you may also have to change some settings in your editing and printer preference menus so they'll know to use the newly generated monitor profile.

Thank you, BurnUnit, I'm reading the link now, I really appreciate your help!!

I think, in general, that the adjustment sliders in the printer drivers should be consider as more of a way of making fine adjustments or tweaking the printer output. If you're having to make major changes to adjust brightness, contrast, saturation and color corrections, there's probably a bigger problem in hiding somewhere else. Like not having a good basic monitor profile, or software that's trying to work in the wrong color space, or a printer that's using (or not using) an ICC color profile when it shouldn't (or should).

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