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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎02-13-2018

How to compose a picture with white/uncolored areas that print nothing on photo paper?

Generally speaking I think I understand the idea that an inkjet printer like my newly acquired Pixma Pro-100 cannot print white.  While photo paper is generally white, I'm thinking that it isn't the purest possible white.  If I want to frame a photograph with a white border do I need to worry about the printer printing something/anything in that area.  In that, is a color (ICC) profile going to change my pure white (code=x'ffffff) to something that does print?  Is there any particular/special technique I should use to compose parts of the picture that I want the printer to leave as the color of the paper?  In that, NOT print!

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,830
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: How to compose a picture with white/uncolored areas that print nothing on photo paper?

No.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472
Valued Contributor
Posts: 387
Registered: ‎11-19-2017

Re: How to compose a picture with white/uncolored areas that print nothing on photo paper?


@aajaxwrote:

Generally speaking I think I understand the idea that an inkjet printer like my newly acquired Pixma Pro-100 cannot print white.  While photo paper is generally white, I'm thinking that it isn't the purest possible white.  If I want to frame a photograph with a white border do I need to worry about the printer printing something/anything in that area.  In that, is a color (ICC) profile going to change my pure white (code=x'ffffff) to something that does print?  Is there any particular/special technique I should use to compose parts of the picture that I want the printer to leave as the color of the paper?  In that, NOT print!


Paper is paper.  The color it is will be the color you get if you select print with border.  No ink is put on those portions of the paper that have a border. 

Rick
Bay Area - CA
~6D2 (f/w 1.0.3) ~16-35mm f2.8L II, 50 f1.8 STM, 85 prime, 70-200 f2.8L IS II ~Sigma 24-70 f2.8 Art (f/w 2.0) ~Sigma 150-600 C + TC1401 1.4x (f/w 1.03) ~Speedlite 430 EX II ~DxO PhotoLab Elite ~DPP 4.8.20 ~Windows10 Pro nVidia GPU 1803 ~Android 8.1
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎02-13-2018

Re: How to compose a picture with white/uncolored areas that print nothing on photo paper?

Yes!  Printer drivers and other computer software allow you to do things with borders that affect the printed output.  However, those things are not part of the picture.  What I'm referring to pertains to the composition of the picture.  In that, I want someone viewing it with a monitor to see the same thing as someone looking at a paper print.

 

Of course via this forum and other lesson sources I have come to learn that you can never expect the COLORS to match exactly when using different devices for viewing.  However, I'm trying to make it so that the composition is essentially the same.  I also realize that I may be misusing the term "composition" when dealing with photographers.  If what I have in mind is understood, I'd be glad to adopt the use of a better term if there is such a thing for image editing.

 

I'm a bit of a novice but after learning a little bit about color mamangement it occured to me that my new photo printer could end up inadvertantly printing where it wasn't desired.  That's what provoked my question.

 

Based on John's reply I'll be hoping that using the purest possible white in the editing will stay sufficiently white during the various transpositions that might occur for it to always equate to the color of photo paper at the time of printing.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,830
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: How to compose a picture with white/uncolored areas that print nothing on photo paper?

While there may be others products that do this, I am only aware of two. Canon Print Studio pro will let you select an option to print the margins on the paper in black. The Canon Pixma Pro-10 printer is a pigment ink printer. As such, it deposits the ink ON the paper, rather than like the Pro-100 dye printer, where the ink is absorbed INTO the paper.

 

Because of that white portions of the image, including the borders, will have a different appearance becasue there is nothing deposited there. The printer has a clear solution called Gloss Optimizer which can be deposited in the white areas to give similar gloss as the ink areas.

 

Those are deliberate operator selected actions.

 

Other than those special cases the answer is No, you do not need to do anything special to ensure that white areas (RGB 255/255/255) of your image are printed without ink.

 

I will note that generally we don't want pure white areas in an image (other than small localized areas like specular highlights)  since those areas have no detail. Different folks have different preferences, but generally highlight warnings are set between 240 and 250.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472
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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎02-13-2018

Re: How to compose a picture with white/uncolored areas that print nothing on photo paper?

Well now, this is the first I've heard about "Gloss Optimizer".  Sounds like something I should know about.  Have been doing a good bit of experimenting with photo paper and trying to learn how to correctly develop pictures and use soft proofing according to paper used for printing.  I will look into that.

 

The fact that my question is about creating the picture doesn't mean I don't want to know about printing them.

 

Your point about pure white in an image is also something that even as a novice I somewhat understand.  This is where I'm struggling a bit with terminology.  In this context, I'd be thinking of the image as what comes out of the camera and then may get developed using software.  Something I've been doing, recently enough that it might also be called an experiment, is then creating what I'll call a picture which is done with software (GIMP in my case) which involves creating a border around the image.  The main purpose of this border is to add text that describes the image.  Most of the time I'll select a color from the image to use for this border in order to produce something that doesn't distract from the image.  However, on dark images, like a recent shot I tried of the moon shining off the water through some mangroves, this doesn't work very well and it seems like a white border/frame outlined in black works better.  My instinct is that for the printer to try and color this border/frame would be undesirable but maybe Gloss Optimizer would be a good idea.

 

Thanks for the enlightenment!

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