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New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎06-26-2017

broken aperture iris

I recently purchased a rebel t5, and unfortunately it was dropped. Everything seemed to be working fine until I started playing with the aperture and notcied there was little difference whether I set it at 5.6 or 10. I took a closer look inside the lens, and realized the aperture iris doesn't move, and appeared to be in peices and not functioning. 

 

Is this repair just going to be wayyyy too much? Would it make sense just to buy a whole new lense? 

 

Thanks! 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,974
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: broken aperture iris

Which lens?

 

If it is the kit 18-55, get a new one, if the old one was the old USM version, the new STM's are better.

VIP
Posts: 8,117
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: broken aperture iris

Any lens that came with a T5 kit is not a good candidate for repair.

A lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,726
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: broken aperture iris


bella32600 wrote:

I recently purchased a rebel t5, and unfortunately it was dropped. Everything seemed to be working fine until I started playing with the aperture and notcied there was little difference whether I set it at 5.6 or 10. I took a closer look inside the lens, and realized the aperture iris doesn't move, and appeared to be in peices and not functioning. 

 

Is this repair just going to be wayyyy too much? Would it make sense just to buy a whole new lense? 

 

Thanks! 


If the iris is really in pieces and the brightness of the image file isn't affected by changes in the aperture setting, then probably the lens is broken and needs replacement. But if you're basing your analysis of the problem on what you see when you look into the lens, you may be jumping to an unwarranted conclusion. On most modern lenses, almost certainly including the one on your camera, the aperture doesn't actually change until the shutter button is pressed. That allows the viewfinder and the autofocus mechanism to take advantage of the full light-gathering power of the lens while you frame the shot. Check your user manual for the location of the camera's depth-of-field preview button. If depressing that button causes the iris to stop down to the right aperture, there may not be anything seriously wrong with the lens.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
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