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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,622
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Which F Number in lens is Suitable For Architecture and Urban landscape photography


ScottyP wrote:

No one has mentioned the excellent Canon EF 16-35 f/4 IS.  It is as sharp or effectively as sharp as the f/2.8 and half the price and is image stabilized so you can often get by on long shutter shots of architecture without a tripod.  

 

Or or look at spending for the specialist TS lenses. 

 


Methinks I've mentioned it once or twice in the past. I do have it, and it is indeed a very satisfactory lens.  Smiley Happy

 

I bought it in preference to the f/2.8 that was current at the time (probably the Mark II) for the reasons Scott mentioned and because I rarely needed a wide angle lens indoors. If I had been a real estate photographer, I might have felt differently. But I was a landscape and event photographer, and the f/4 made more sense.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,228
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Which F Number in lens is Suitable For Architecture and Urban landscape photography


ScottyP wrote:

No one has mentioned the excellent Canon EF 16-35 f/4 IS.  It is as sharp or effectively as sharp as the f/2.8 and half the price and is image stabilized so you can often get by on long shutter shots of architecture without a tripod.  

 

Or or look at spending for the specialist TS lenses.  


I have no doubt that the EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM is a great lens.  But, it is probably more of a good replacement than an upgrade over the EF 17-40mm f/4L USM.

I am not a real estate or architectural photographer, so I cannot speak for other photographers, but I do not always use a tripod for long shutter shuts, or camera stability.  I frequently use one to get a specific shot perspective or camera height, especially when I am shooting indoors.

 

For example, the average room has an 8 foot ceiling.  Mounting the camera at the midpoint halfway to the ceiling, four feet above the floor, allows you to level the camera with a wide angle lens, minimizing barrel distortion.  Four feet is also a good starting point for taking indoor shots with a T-S lens, for when you may want to angle the camera away from level.

Crouching down not only looks awkward, it is not a steady way to hold a camera,  Using a tripod allows me to lower the camera, which makes many of my indoor shots look better.  

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