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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,291
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?


@TCampbell wrote:

The best way to protect the lens is to attach the lens hood so that nothing can bang the end of it.

 

I "own" UV fitlers, but generally don't use them.  Fitlers create reflections that can result in "ghosting" on your images ... they often make things worse.  If you do use filters, spring the extra $$$ to buy filters with good anti-reflective coatings.

 

Don't use a CP as a protecting filter... use that *only* when you actually need to polarize the light.  Polarizers will cut a good deal of the light ... substantially changing your exposure.

 


I agree with Tim and have regretted it only once. I had been photographing a lecture or panel discussion at work; and while snapping off a few during the meet-and-greet session afterwards, I helped myself at the buffet table. I discovered a half hour later that one of my lenses (the Sigma 50-150mm f/2.8, IIRC) had had an encounter with a bowl of sour cream dip. Lesson learned: If you're wearing a camera, stay away from the food!

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 44
Registered: ‎01-27-2018

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?

Thank you Bob and Tim for the comment and suggestion.

 

I would say lens hood such as those for 70-200 might provides sufficient protection for the lens, especially front element. I am not certain the same can be said for the hood that came with the 24-70 f2.8 mark ii. It is very shallow, which don't provide much protection at all. Wondering if canon has another hood for this lens?

 

Cheers,

LV

Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,290
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?


@limvo05 wrote:

 

 

I would say lens hood such as those for 70-200 might provides sufficient protection for the lens, especially front element. I am not certain the same can be said for the hood that came with the 24-70 f2.8 mark ii. It is very shallow, which don't provide much protection at all. Wondering if canon has another hood for this lens?

 

Cheers,

LV


No.  If there were another hood, such as a hood with longer petals, then it is possible for the petals to show up in the frame at the shorter focal length settings. As you noted, a hood can only offer so much protection at short focal lengths.  A properly sized hood is a function of the focal length of the lens, not the diameter of the front element or filter threads.

 

A clear, protective filter provides more than protection against bumps and bangs.  My filters keep the front element of my lenses clean.  I have never really had to clean the front elements.  But, the filters I have had to clean, most especially on the most heavily used lenses.

There are pros and cons to using a screw-on filter to protect the lens.  

 

I, for one, am clumsy when it comes replacing a lens cap.  So, knowing that I am rubbing the cap against a filter, instead of the front element, makes it worth it for me.   Cleaning a filter is easier and safer than cleaning the front element, so it is worth it to me.  The high quality clear filters have very little, if any, effect on image quality.

The purist argument says that you can go without a filter.  The practical argument says you are better with one, than without one.  All I say is that if you choose to go with a protective filter, then choose a high quality clear filter.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Honored Contributor
Posts: 6,290
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?


@TCampbell wrote:

The best way to protect the lens is to attach the lens hood so that nothing can bang the end of it.

 

I "own" UV fitlers, but generally don't use them.  Fitlers create reflections that can result in "ghosting" on your images ... they often make things worse.  If you do use filters, spring the extra $$$ to buy filters with good anti-reflective coatings.

 

Don't use a CP as a protecting filter... use that *only* when you actually need to polarize the light.  Polarizers will cut a good deal of the light ... substantially changing your exposure.

 


A hood does offer protection against bumps.  But, that protection vanishes as the focal length becomes shorter.  A hood protects a longer lens better than a shorter one.

In the case of my son, who broke his filter while the camera was in the bag when it flew off of the car seat, the hood was mounted in a reversed position for storage, he said.

I agree that if you do not need UV, CP, or ND for a specific shot, then you should use one.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
VIP
Posts: 9,053
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?

"The best  Another way to protect the lens is to attach the lens hood so that nothing can bang the end of it."

 

Sentence was corrected.  How anybody can say they would prefer to clean the front element of a lens in favor of a replaceable filter is beyond me.  But it does take all types of folks to make a world.

 

One other aspect to this is, filters remove as easily as they attach.  If you encounter a ghosting problem take it off.  Geez, how hard is that?  With high quality protecto filters ghosting is rarely an issue.

A lot less stuff for 2018 but still a lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
VIP
Posts: 9,053
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?

"I had been photographing a lecture or panel discussion at work;..."

 

Must have been adults?  The situation is much different when photographing kids events.

A lot less stuff for 2018 but still a lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,445
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"The best  Another way to protect the lens is to attach the lens hood so that nothing can bang the end of it."

 

Sentence was corrected.  How anybody can say they would prefer to clean the front element of a lens in favor of a replaceable filter is beyond me.  But it does take all types of folks to make a world.

 

One other aspect to this is, filters remove as easily as they attach.  If you encounter a ghosting problem take it off.  Geez, how hard is that?  With high quality protecto filters ghosting is rarely an issue.


 

 

#1 ... handle the camera & lenses properly to protect them from getting dirty.  Pop the dust caps on the lenses when you're finished using them.  Keep the camera body stored either with lens attached or with the body dust caps attached.  When changing a lens in the field, don't do it in a spot where the sand & dust is blowing... protect it.  

 

#2 ...  I don't clean a lens because I was able to find one piece of dust on it... I clean my lens when there's something that will obviously need to be removed.  This means sometimes go a few years between cleanings (no kidding -- I don't think I have ever cleaned the same lens twice in the same year.)

 

#3 ... the lens actually is glass... not plastic.  Glass is actually hard... very hard.  It's difficult to scratch real glass unless you something on your lens that is harder than glass.  But you'd never do that when cleaning the lens.  So don't use sandpaper to clean the lens.  Use a clean soft microfiber cloth.   Don't use harsh cleaners... usually a drop of water is good enough ... lightly moisten a corner of the cleaning cloth in ordinary water and give it a wipe (water is a universal solvent for everything except lipids).  Give it a gentle wipe... then use a dry corner to give it another soft wipe... and it's good as new.

 

The problem with leaving a filter on all the time... is that you may not notice issues until you get back to your computer, import your shots for the day, then look at them on a large monitor.  You start to notice things you couldn't see on the small 3" screen.

 

Having grown up in the era where film was sensitive to UV light, we always used a UV filter.  Now that the camera has a built-in UV filter, the lens filter is no longer needed ... but the habbit of owning one for every lens stuck with me.  It wasn't until I realized that other photographers weren't using filters and were getting slightly better quality than me... that I stopped using the filters (and am happier for it.)  I still own them.   If I'm shooting at a location where I think they'll be helpful, I will put one on the lens.  But they don't live on the lenses. 

 

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
VIP
Posts: 9,053
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?

"But it does take all types of folks to make a world."

 

Shooting the heavens is not the same as shooting for a living.  Two different 'worlds' there my friend.  It isn't the 'hard' glass that is damaged.  It is the lens coatings that is vulnerable.  I totally agree most folks probably clean their lenses and filters way more than they need to. A little gunk on the front element won't effect the photo.  While ghosting can happen it is so rare with high quality filters I really never worry about it.  There again shooting the stars is different.  If in doubt, take it off.

 

If you like'em, use'em.  If you don't, don't.  But they do serve a purpose.

A lot less stuff for 2018 but still a lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,291
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"I had been photographing a lecture or panel discussion at work;..."

 

Must have been adults?  The situation is much different when photographing kids events.


They were adults, though I have to confess that I'm missing your point. Is it that the kids would have wolfed down all the sour cream dip before I had a chance to get my lens near it?

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,291
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: UV filter or CP to protect lens?


@ebiggs1 wrote:

"The best  Another way to protect the lens is to attach the lens hood so that nothing can bang the end of it."

 

Sentence was corrected.  How anybody can say they would prefer to clean the front element of a lens in favor of a replaceable filter is beyond me.  But it does take all types of folks to make a world.

 

One other aspect to this is, filters remove as easily as they attach.  If you encounter a ghosting problem take it off.  Geez, how hard is that?  With high quality protecto filters ghosting is rarely an issue.


Get off your high horse, Ernie. If you have a ghosting problem, you're most likely to notice it in post-processing. What good does taking off the filter do then?

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
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