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New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-01-2017

Super Macro Question

I'm still pretty new to photography. I have a 50D body and want to do macro. I have the 100mm f2.8 USM lens and want to reverse mount my 50mm f1.8 STM lens to it for super macro. Is this a decent rig to try as I read recently that using two 50mm lenses is the way to go? Any input for a newbie for super macro rigs or macro photography in general? I mostly shoot insects and plants. My male male conversion ring for the reverse mount is still in the mail so have not yet tried it. Thanks!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,607
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Super Macro Question


BigFish333 wrote:

I'm still pretty new to photography. I have a 50D body and want to do macro. I have the 100mm f2.8 USM lens and want to reverse mount my 50mm f1.8 STM lens to it for super macro. Is this a decent rig to try as I read recently that using two 50mm lenses is the way to go? Any input for a newbie for super macro rigs or macro photography in general? I mostly shoot insects and plants. My male male conversion ring for the reverse mount is still in the mail so have not yet tried it. Thanks!


I would recommend buying a set of extension tubes, as a cheaper simpler alternative especially set that retains auto-focus.  I have never used a reverse mount, because it seems to me that you must dedicate a lens for that express purpose.  

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Posts: 8,239
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Super Macro Question

First if you are serious about macro, close-up, photography this isn’t the best solution. There are reasons that lenses are engineered specifically the way they are.  Converting them to what they are not designed for is not the best choice.  Plus leaving the lens on in reverse can potentially let dust inside your lens.  You lose any auto feature of the camera.

 

Large apertures get a very narrow DOF. The smallest shift in your camera position changes what is in focus. It’s extremely difficult to hold the camera steady enough to get consistent shots.  You need a good tripod and lots of light.

 

A lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
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