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Posts: 8,118
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Looking into full frame

"Ebiggs
I assume you saying to take a longer look at crop before going ff.
If you suggesting crop what you roccomend. I believe right now I'm seriously considering the 6D2, mostly due to price 


What ya thoughts"

 

First I thought you were considering the 6D Mk II as your choice?  If that is correct I would opt for the 7D Mk II.

Price wise?  7D Mk II is $1500 vs 6D Mk II at $2000.  Last time I checked.

You can look at the specs of each for yourself.  The 7D Mk II bets the 6D Mk II is several of them. Remember at $500 less dollars.

 

"I guess my thought about jumping to ff was the lens selection would be better."

 

The 7D Mk II can use more lenses then the 6D Mk II can.  Not fewer!  It can use any lens the 6D Mk II can plus the full EF-S line.  Again remember price as the EF-S line is cheaper.  The STM models being very good indeed.

 

I have never been a fan of the 6D or even the newer 6D Mk II. It seems like a solution to a problem we didn't have.  BTW, even if you were to ask 7D Mk II vs 5D Mk III, I still would opt for the 7D Mk II.  There is nothing either of those FF cameras can do that the 7D Mk II can't.

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VIP
Posts: 8,118
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Looking into full frame

"While EF (full-frame) lenses will work on a crop camera, their focal lengths tend to be more appropriate for full-frame."

 

This is a problem that is web manufactured.  If a person thinks of AOV (angle of view) in favor of focal length, this is a moot point.  The sole point where it can be a factor is the WA side.  But that is not difficult to overcome anymore.  

If you consider the advantage on the tele end it is pretty much a wash.  Isn't it?

 

This only exists and is valid for people that shot 35mm film anyway.  We are reaching a point where new comers never shot film so they don't care. 

 

"Canon's full-frame cameras are better in low light than their crop cameras are."

 

The issue here is the 6D Mk II vs the 7D Mk II not Canon's FF line as a whole.   I doubt, real world, you can really see any low light advantage from the 6D Mk II over the 7D Mk II.

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,728
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Looking into full frame


ebiggs1 wrote:

"While EF (full-frame) lenses will work on a crop camera, their focal lengths tend to be more appropriate for full-frame."

 

This is a problem that is web manufactured.  If a person thinks of AOV (angle of view) in favor of focal length, this is a moot point.  The sole point where it can be a factor is the WA side.  But that is not difficult to overcome anymore.  

If you consider the advantage on the tele end it is pretty much a wash.  Isn't it?

 

This only exists and is valid for people that shot 35mm film anyway.  We are reaching a point where new comers never shot film so they don't care.

...


That's a curvature of history, so to speak. The standard lens on a 35mm camera was 50mm because its field of view, given the camera's frame size of 24x36 mm, approximated that of the human eye. That tradition was carried on in FF DSLRs, whose frame size is about the same as that of a 35mm camera. That's why the standard FF "walkaround" zoom lens is 24-70mm; it has about the same reach on each side of 50mm. The 16-35mm wide angle, and the 70-200mm telephoto have evolved as good matches on each side of the standard lens.

 

But on an APS-C ("crop frame") camera, the human eye's field of view is approximated by a lens of about 29mm, and the standard walkaround zoom is therefore around 17-55mm. This has resulted in corresponding wide-angle and telephoto zooms of about 11-16 and 50-150 mm, respectively.

 

This all makes perfect sense and is in no way "web manufactured". And it means that we're confronted with two series of lenses, one optimized for FF cameras and the other for crop cameras. But Canon's best lenses, their "L" lenses, all fit into the FF series and are therefore sub-optimal on a crop-frame camera. They work as intended and take great pictures, but they're just not the focal lengths that most users would really prefer. Additionally, Canon doesn't even make some of the lenses that you'd probably want on a crop camera, so you have to look to a 3rd-party manufacturer if you can find them at all.

 

So, no it isn't pretty much a wash.

 

BTW, just to avoid possible confusion among those who weren't around in the film era: The "35mm" used to characterize a particular type of film camera has nothing to do with either focal length or frame size. It refers to the width (including provision for sprocket holes) of the film those cameras used.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
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Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Looking into full frame

"This all makes perfect sense and is in no way "web manufactured"."

 

It certainly does to an old guy, like Robert, that can't let the 35mm film format go.  Not so much to those of us that have moved on.  The entire term 'crop camera' is "web manufactured".  It is not a trade name and certainly not a Canon name.

I would concede some small credence to you thoughts in the WA, I thought I mentioned that earlier, but in no way to the tele side of focal length. If anything all the 'best' Canon L lenses are better on a 'crop camera'.

 

"Canon doesn't even make some of the lenses that you'd probably want on a crop camera, ..."

 

Really?  You have gone from the sublime to the ridiculous there my friend.  What about the Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens? I will grant you build is not up to a "L" but not optical.  What about the newer STM line?   And you say I can't get excellent results form an L lens like the Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Lens on a cropper?  Ridiculous, yes!

 

Now if we want to mention the prime L lens line up your argument really falls apart.  Choose it by AOV and not focal length.  Simple, simple, simple.

 

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Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,436
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Looking into full frame


diverhank wrote:

Noka wrote:


I can only tell you from my own experience, I own both a 5D Mark III (full frame) and a 7D Mark II (cropped) and I find that for any kind of shooting outside of wild life (Birds in Flight), I keep reaching for the 5D Mark III...it's better even for wild life (if reach and speed is not a factor).


I agree with you on that point.  Just about the only time I reach for the 7D2 is when I want to use the super telephoto on a bright sunny day.  Otherwise, the 7D2 is not the first or second choice.  I go with the 6D and the 6D2, now.  It used to be the 6D and a 1D4.

in my short time with the 6D2, it seems to track at least as well as the 7D2.  I have been shooting high school football at night, and water fowl during the day.  The 6D2 vary rarely misses focus.  And, it focuses rather quickly, too.  The 6D2 also has in-camera stabilization, which really helps when fast panning, no matter the direction.

All I can say about the 7D2 is that the 7D3 has big mountain to climb to top the 6D2.

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Frequent Contributor
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎04-17-2014

Re: Looking into full frame

Travel? Landscape? You will want to consider weight. I use a 5D Mark IV and a 6D Mark II. I rarely take the 5D out of the house. I would recommend the 6D or the 6D Mark II. It's true the camera has drawn some criticism, but the great majority of it comes from people who have not owned the camera.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,728
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Looking into full frame


ebiggs1 wrote:

"This all makes perfect sense and is in no way "web manufactured"."

 

It certainly does to an old guy, like Robert, that can't let the 35mm film format go.  Not so much to those of us that have moved on.  The entire term 'crop camera' is "web manufactured".  It is not a trade name and certainly not a Canon name.

I would concede some small credence to you thoughts in the WA, I thought I mentioned that earlier, but in no way to the tele side of focal length. If anything all the 'best' Canon L lenses are better on a 'crop camera'.

 

"Canon doesn't even make some of the lenses that you'd probably want on a crop camera, ..."

 

Really?  You have gone from the sublime to the ridiculous there my friend.  What about the Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Lens? I will grant you build is not up to a "L" but not optical.  What about the newer STM line?   And you say I can't get excellent results form an L lens like the Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM Lens on a cropper?  Ridiculous, yes!

 

Now if we want to mention the prime L lens line up your argument really falls apart.  Choose it by AOV and not focal length.  Simple, simple, simple.

 


I was going to try to answer Ernie's jabs, but have decided instead to rely on the ability of anyone who's interested to read and understand what I actually wrote. There are only 24 hours in a day.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
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Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Looking into full frame

"There are only 24 hours in a day."

 

Maybe if there were 25 hour days that extra hour would help pull you from the 35mm film days.  They are over Robert.

 

There are people out there that buy a new Rebel with the kit lens and believe it or not, they never consider how that kit lens would look on a 35mm camera.  Then along comes old guys or inner web jocks that keep or start the confusion all over.

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VIP
Posts: 8,118
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Looking into full frame

"I believe right now I'm seriously considering the 6D2, mostly due to price"

 

But you guys glossed over the last part!  The 7D Mk II is less expensive that the 6D Mk II.  It is just as capable or better.  It isn't the cameras fault if you guys don't know how to use it. The two cameras, beside sensors, are very similar.  One gets a better spec in some point and the other in a different spec. But the 7D Mk II has the better price as mentioned above.

 

The 6D Mk II is more like a FF version of the 80D, IMHO.  BTW, I would pick the 80D over the 6D Mk II and save $900 bucks,

A lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,728
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Looking into full frame


ebiggs1 wrote:

"There are only 24 hours in a day."

 

Maybe if there were 25 hour days that extra hour would help pull you from the 35mm film days.  They are over Robert.

 

There are people out there that buy a new Rebel with the kit lens and believe it or not, they never consider how that kit lens would look on a 35mm camera.  Then along comes old guys or inner web jocks that keep or start the confusion all over.


How old do you think I am, Ernie? And how much difference does it make anyway? The time I almost died, I was considerably younger than you are now.

 

The fact is that I had pretty much opted out of photography in the film days, because taking and processing pictures was such an expensive, time-consuming hassle. I got back in, early in the digital age, in order to be able to photograph my grandchildren. My wife and I had been Nikon users, but bought Canon P&Ses on the recommendation of our daughter (a very good child photographer who probably should have turned pro). Etc. (The full story of my photographic life is boring, even to me. Suffice it to say that when I retired last year, I had spent several years as the semi-official photographer of a fairly significant city government and had absorbed some understanding of digital photography.)

 

But here I am; and, like it or not, I still remember that some of the conventions of digital photography (such as what "full frame" means) were carried over from the film days. You obviously remember it too, since your experience is about an order of magnitude (you know what that means, right?) greater than mine. So why do you resent that connection being pointed out? I'm not trying to belittle you. I'm just trying, as best I can, to help the next generation understand what's going on and avoid at least some of my many mistakes.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
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