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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎01-11-2013
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Lenses falling off Canon 6D

I was in Chicago last fall at a nephew's wedding. I was shooting some pictures of the wedding dance when I was bumped by another guest. Next thing you know my 24-70 lens was bouncing off the floor. I know the lens was locked in as it was functioning perfectly at the time (it just auto-focused an image and was re-focusing for another when I got bumped) My hand was nowhere near the lens release button and I cannot figure out how this may have happened. Also, if it was not locked in place, my lenses do not autofocus.

I had it repaired the lens and am using it again. I had put this out of my mind until a long-time friend an professional photographer of 40 years+ called and asked about the accident I had with the lens falling off. He had thought I was crazy when I told him the story originally. He then proceeded to tell me he just had the same thing happen with his 6D and a 100mm Macro lens.

He was shooting some high school team photos when his lens came off the camera.

I am wondering how many other 6D owners have had this happen. Is there a lock issue? 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,763
Registered: ‎02-17-2016

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D

Reputable Contributor
Posts: 792
Registered: ‎02-06-2013

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D

I too like your friend used to think it was crazy or the user had done something wrong to have a lens fell off until it also happened to me.  In my case I was lucky enough I caught it in mid-air by pinning it against my arm and my body.

 

What happened in my case was that I was walking around in rough terrain with considerable bouncing motion and my finger had brushed by the release button (without me knowing it) and the lens became unlocked but it did not fall out yet.  After a while, because of the bouncing motion, the lens came off.  Part of my workflow now is to occasionally twist the lens to see if it's locked.

 

I think it's a semi-design issue...the lens release works great normally but can come loose in some situations.  Not sure what the fix can be though...

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Diverhank's photos on Flickr
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,742
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D


borderjack wrote:

I was in Chicago last fall at a nephew's wedding. I was shooting some pictures of the wedding dance when I was bumped by another guest. Next thing you know my 24-70 lens was bouncing off the floor. I know the lens was locked in as it was functioning perfectly at the time (it just auto-focused an image and was re-focusing for another when I got bumped) My hand was nowhere near the lens release button and I cannot figure out how this may have happened. Also, if it was not locked in place, my lenses do not autofocus.

I had it repaired the lens and am using it again. I had put this out of my mind until a long-time friend an professional photographer of 40 years+ called and asked about the accident I had with the lens falling off. He had thought I was crazy when I told him the story originally. He then proceeded to tell me he just had the same thing happen with his 6D and a 100mm Macro lens.

He was shooting some high school team photos when his lens came off the camera.

I am wondering how many other 6D owners have had this happen. Is there a lock issue? 


Let me guess you use a Black Rapid Strap? If so that seems to be the common thing with people complaining about lenses detachng from their cameera. 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,852
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D

I don't understand how this could happen with a properly functioning lens mount.  In order to release a lens, a "double action" is required, one which should require two hands.  You must hold the button depressed, while turning the lens.  

 

You can fully press the lens release button, and then release the button.  The lens stays locked in place.  So, just merely pressing the button should be insufficient to release the lens.  That's not how it works.

 

Has it ever happened to me?  I would have to say, "Yes."

 

Both times, I realized that I was at fault.  The first time was a day or two after I bought my first Canon DSLR.  I was lounging in the Lay-Z-Boy, experimenting with holding the camera and turning the zoom ring, when the lens dropped into my lap.

 

The second time it happened was when I had a super telephoto mounted on a tripod, when I wanted to rotate the camera to portrait position.  Apparently, when I loosened the collar, I must have left it a bit too tight.  When I grabbed the camera with both hands, like a steering wheel, and turned the camera body, it came right off the lens.  One of my left fingers must have been pressing the button when I rotated the camera body.

 

The release requires what engineers call a "double action", which makes it difficult to have an accident.  You almost have to do it on purpose, or just not pay attention.

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Reputable Contributor
Posts: 792
Registered: ‎02-06-2013

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D


Waddizzle wrote:

I don't understand how this could happen with a properly functioning lens mount.  In order to release a lens, a "double action" is required, one which should require two hands.  You must hold the button depressed, while turning the lens.  

 

You can fully press the lens release button, and then release the button.  The lens stays locked in place.  So, just merely pressing the button should be insufficient to release the lens.  That's not how it works.

 

Has it ever happened to me?  I would have to say, "Yes."

 

Both times, I realized that I was at fault.  The first time was a day or two after I bought my first Canon DSLR.  I was lounging in the Lay-Z-Boy, experimenting with holding the camera and turning the zoom ring, when the lens dropped into my lap.

 

The second time it happened was when I had a super telephoto mounted on a tripod, when I wanted to rotate the camera to portrait position.  Apparently, when I loosened the collar, I must have left it a bit too tight.  When I grabbed the camera with both hands, like a steering wheel, and turned the camera body, it came right off the lens.  One of my left fingers must have been pressing the button when I rotated the camera body.

 

The release requires what engineers call a "double action", which makes it difficult to have an accident.  You almost have to do it on purpose, or just not pay attention.


Nobody said it wasn't their fault - at least partly.  The fact that it could happen at all points to the fact that the design is not robust enough to be foolproof.  Even in your experience that you described, it didn't take much for the stupid lens to fall out.  In my case the bouncing motion was enough to turn the lens to the fall out position.  Believe, it was not hard to reproduce it.

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Diverhank's photos on Flickr
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,852
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D

@diverhank 

Maybe so,  But.  It should still require a "double action".  My advice is for people to test their release buttons.  If merely pressing and releasing the button unlocks your lenses, then your lens mount needs to be repaired.  

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,929
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D

The lens lock is designed to make this unlikely... but that doesn't mean it's not possible.

 

On the camera body (I don't have a 6D, so this photo of my 5D III will have to suffice... all Canon EOS cameras use the same mechanism) you'll notice a small pin on the lens mounting flange (front of camera body) which is adjacent to the lens release button.

 

2W0A0285.jpg

 

If you press the release button with no lens attached, you'll see the pin retracts and this allows rotation of the lens.

 

Meanwhile on on the lens (this is my Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM original... not the "II") you'll see there is a small hole milled into the mounting ring.

 

2W0A0283.jpg

 

When the pin "clicks" into that hole, the lens cannot be rotated without pressing the release button to retract the pin.  

 

But pressing the release button alone isn't enough to make the lens come off.  The lens must also be rotated counter-clockwise about 60º.  

 

I have had this happen to me only once in all my years of shooting... but I caught the issue before the lens came off the camera.

 

It turns out that it's possible to hit the button and rotate the lens just enough so that the locking pin is no longer aligned with the locking hole -- it's resting on the edge of the locking hole.  The electronic contacts that allow camera & body to communicate are still touching because the contacts are large enough.  This gives you the illusion that your lens is attached because the camera can control it.  

 

Generally you will make some adjustment to either a zoom ring or to the focus ring... and that rotates the lens the rest of the way.

 

In my own incident, I retraced my actions and I realized that I had allowed myself to develop a bad habit -- not of how I was holding the lens -- but rather of how I was retrieving it from my camera bag.  My most-used lens is a 70-200 and it lives on my camera body.  My camera bag is configured so that it fits in the bag with the lens still attached.  But the easiest way to retreive the camera is to grasp the lens with my left hand and lift it out of the bag... then put my right hand on the camera body.  When doing this, the knuckle on my left thumb was pressing up against the lens-release.  While I wasn't deliberately attempting to release the lens, the weight of the camera body (and the fact that my right hand wasn't holding it) allowed just enough rotation to prevent the locking pin from re-engaging.

 

Consequently, I developed a better method of pulling the camera from the bag and giving the lens a gentle twist when I retrieve my camera to make sure the pin actually is still locked.

 

I've never had a recurrence.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,852
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D

"But pressing the release button alone isn't enough to make the lens come off. The lens must also be rotated counter-clockwise about 60º. "

 

Exactly.  Releasing a lens from a properly functioning lens mount requires a "double action" to release it.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Reputable Contributor
Posts: 792
Registered: ‎02-06-2013

Re: Lenses falling off Canon 6D


Waddizzle wrote:

"But pressing the release button alone isn't enough to make the lens come off. The lens must also be rotated counter-clockwise about 60º. "

 

Exactly.  Releasing a lens from a properly functioning lens mount requires a "double action" to release it.


In my case the double action was: 1. accidentally touched the release button and 2. the bouncing rotated the lens. This was my 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 II and the tripod mount helped with the bouncing and gravity.

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Diverhank's photos on Flickr
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