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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,929
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: 80D ISO Noise concern

[ Edited ]

@TTMartinwrote:

@Lonestar_Northwrote:

I just bought a brand new 80D.  I bought it to replace my 7D as I wanted to get improved high ISO noise performane.  My first day of shooting leaves me very dissapointed.  Is this typical of what I am to expect?

 

Link to higher resolution

http://lonestarnorth.ifp3.com/#/gallery/test-gallery/iso-80d-320/

 

Here is a screen shot of ISO 640 F8 and the sewcond at 320.  

 


You appear to be confusing Out Of Focus (OOF) areas with noise. 

 

A dSLR with a long lens will have a very shallow depth of field. The area out of that depth of field will be blurry and could be confused with noise. What you are depicting appears to be normal OOF area and not noise.


You can also make OOF areas look noisy by applying global sharpening. 

 

800% view of unsharpened OOF sky
no sharp sky.jpg

 

800% view of oversharpened OOF sky.over sharp sky.jpg

 

If you are using Lightroom avoid using global sharpening settings like 'Clarity' that also 'sharpen' OOF areas and ruin the bokeh. 

 

The way to avoid this is to use Masking to apply a heavy sharpening mask in Lightroom so you don't sharpen even areas.

lr 1.jpg

 

By pressing and holding the 'ALT' key, while moving the 'Masking' slider you can see what is being masked. Black areas will not be sharpened.

LR sharpening 1.png

 

Smooth unsharpened bokeh.

LR sharpening 2.jpg

 

Typically when using a heavy mask I set sharpening to 100. By using a heavy mask I can keep my noise reduction settings lower. My Noise Reduction settings are usually Luminance between 10-25, Contrast is set to match, i.e. 10-25, and Color is set to twice the Luminance value i.e.  25-50. I leave Detail and Smoothness at their defaults. 

 

Product Expert
Product Expert
Posts: 640
Registered: ‎10-17-2012

Re: 80D ISO Noise concern

Lonestar North, 

We have evaluated the photos you sent and do not see any die hard issues that are present within the camera system that are readily apparent to the naked eye.  Other users here have offered many different suggestions as to the cause of the issue and there is merit in the things that were recommended.  It's possible you're experiencing a twofold issue of it being a new camera and over processing of the images in post production.   

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Occasional Contributor
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎03-18-2018

Re: 80D ISO Noise concern

[ Edited ]

I would agree with new to the camera.  I took the camera and new Canon 100-400 lens to Costa Rica and had excellent low light results.  I disagree with the overly post processed as those example photos were not post processed at all. (Link page from above post was removed)

I am pleased with the performance of the 80D allowing me to shoot as high as 1600 ISO, although I do still need to denoise to clean them up.

 

rufous-tailed-hummingbird_6515-64125wm.jpghoffmanns-woodpecker_6537-46.jpg

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Super Contributor
Posts: 245
Registered: ‎02-13-2016

Re: 80D ISO Noise concern

[ Edited ]

I don't know how this looks on anyone else's monitor but I'm seeing what looks like over-sharpening in this shot in the areas marked in green. At least it seems excessive for web display at this size. There's obvious halos in the high contrast areas. Sharpening isn't "one size fits all" and tends to be dependent on intended use. Display on a monitor, making small prints or making larger prints might call for a different approach to sharpening.

 

Screenshot.png

The areas marked in blue don't really look like noise as much as artifacting from over-compression when converting to jpeg.

The second image look pretty clean to me. It might benefit from a bit of light sharpening if you haven't done so already. But if you wanted to get a bit more "pop" from this shot I'd go for a little more contrast, or opening up the highlights and midtones. I'd try a touch more saturation too and see how it responded. If you decide it needs a bit of sharpening, do so only after you've done any other adjustments and keep it subtle.

 

Edit To Add:

Actually, your second shot above looks much better on my home monitor. My monitor at work is set up to make text look better rather than for viewing photos.

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