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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,182
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: Settings for fast airplanes

One suggestion I make now that I don't think is in the article is to set your camera so that it's between f 8 & f 11 when zoomed out at the empty sky where the planes will be flying. This is done after picking the shutter speed you want to use by setting an appropriate ISO and as the day goes by you should re check this. The idea is to avoid having the camera end up in the high F stop numbers which show any & all dust on the sensor. It usually forces the camera to use an f stop very close to wide open on low passes with a dark background (usually trees) but in general works out nicely. 

Have fun & enjoy the event too. I consider it as getting to enjoy 2 hobbies at the same time.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."
Occasional Contributor
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎01-01-2017

Re: Settings for fast airplanes

Will do 😎
Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,754
Registered: ‎12-02-2012

Re: Settings for fast airplanes


cicopo wrote:

One suggestion I make now that I don't think is in the article is to set your camera so that it's between f 8 & f 11 when zoomed out at the empty sky where the planes will be flying. This is done after picking the shutter speed you want to use by setting an appropriate ISO and as the day goes by you should re check this. The idea is to avoid having the camera end up in the high F stop numbers which show any & all dust on the sensor. It usually forces the camera to use an f stop very close to wide open on low passes with a dark background (usually trees) but in general works out nicely. 

Have fun & enjoy the event too. I consider it as getting to enjoy 2 hobbies at the same time.


Now that's a good piece of advice that comes from shooting this subject a lot. I wouldn't have even thought about aperture in terms of dust spots, but, now that you mention it, if you were shooting a blue sky at really small apertures you are begging to see dust spots. 

Scott

Canon 6D, EF 70-200mm L f/2.8 IS mk2; EF 16-35 f/2.8 L mk. III; Sigma 35mm f/1.4 "Art" EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro; EF 85mm f/1.8; EF 1.4x extender mk. 3; EF 24-105 f/4 L; EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS; 3x Phottix Mitros+ speedlites

Why do so many people say "FER-tographer"? Do they take "fertographs"?
Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,483
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Settings for fast airplanes

Took my first swing at an RC show last weekend.  Some of the jet aircraft seemed to move faster than what the camera could focus, when they were flying almost towards me, for a head-on shot.  

 

Passing shots were near impossible to catch, no matter what I did.  I got my best shots during takeoffs and landings, and when they aircraft would turn around.  Some of the aerial stunts were easy to photograph, and some were not.

 

It was a variable cloudy day, with scattered showers in the forecast, although we saw no rain.  Because light was quickly changing, I used Manual mode, and set ISO to AUTO, which varied from 100 to 3200 as I varied shutter from 1/320 to 1/1000.

 

EOS-1D Mark IV2017_08_120918.jpg

 

Most of the shots were at 1/500 and f/8.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
VIP
Posts: 8,141
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Settings for fast airplanes

"Some of the jet aircraft seemed to move faster than what the camera could focus,..."

 

You need to learn how to pan.

A lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,483
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Settings for fast airplanes


ebiggs1 wrote:

"Some of the jet aircraft seemed to move faster than what the camera could focus,..."

 

You need to learn how to pan.


Please, explain to the class how to pan when the subject is a model jet that is approaching you at top speed.  I ask because that is what I was talking about.  

While you're at it, explain to the class how to pan when the model passes you at speed, covering a hundred yards in a 2-3 seconds, if not less.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
VIP
Posts: 8,141
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Settings for fast airplanes

""A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought.""

 

As a experienced RC photographer is fond of saying. Sorry if you find it difficult.  But if it wasn't just anybody could do it.

A lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 5,483
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Settings for fast airplanes


ebiggs1 wrote:

""A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought.""

 

As a experienced RC photographer is fond of saying. Sorry if you find it difficult.  But if it wasn't just anybody could do it.


As I am so fond of saying, I find your posts to be offensive.  Your initial comment was designed to be an insult.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,182
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: Settings for fast airplanes

i'm downloading my cards from today's big event but for jets (no prop blur needed) I recommend 1/1000 & faster & in general use 1/1600-1/2000 most of the time these days. This is a high speed pass (about 200 MPH) from a month ago using my 300 L IS on my 7D2

 

7D2_2055v1.JPG

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,182
Registered: ‎11-14-2012

Re: Settings for fast airplanes

[ Edited ]

Where was your jet event? Was it the New England Jet Rally? A few friends are attending it.

"A skill is developed through constant practice with a passion to improve, not bought."
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