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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,215
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: New member needs help


lurechunker wrote:
Our bird feeder is 20 meters away. How about starting with a EF-S 18-135 mm f/3.5 - 5.6 IS?

It doesn't matter where the feeder is; it matters where you are. When you have a feeder, the object isn't to hide from the birds; it's to hang around the feeder and get the birds used to seeing you there and have them conclude that you're not a threat. Then you can take as many pictures as you like with pretty much any lens with a modicum of telephoto range. Where you need the really long lenses is for birds of prey. They usually don't frequent feeders, and they tend to stay up pretty high while hunting small animals or deciding to dive for a fish. And they move fast (otherwise the food gets away), so you need a camera that can track that motion.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,526
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: New member needs help

"Then you can take as many pictures as you like with pretty much any lens ..."

 

You don't do any bird photos do you Robert?  What about the birds that are traveling through? The migrants?  Why don't you give it a try, "with a modicum of telephoto", and I will use the suggested 400mil?

A lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,215
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: New member needs help


ebiggs1 wrote:

"Then you can take as many pictures as you like with pretty much any lens ..."

 

You don't do any bird photos do you Robert?  What about the birds that are traveling through? The migrants?  Why don't you give it a try, "with a modicum of telephoto", and I will use the suggested 400mil?


I guess I didn't make my point clear. When I said that, I was referring to birds that congregate at your feeder and are used to seeing you hanging around with your camera. For birds that eschew feeders and generally stay high, like many predatory and migratory birds, of course you need a long lens.

 

What I was driving at is that if you have a feeder, you don't have to hide in the distance and use a really long lens. Birds that frequent feeders quickly figure out who's a threat (cats, larger birds, etc.) and who isn't (photographers, especially those carrying bags of birdseed) and will usually allow you to get reasonably close.

 

The barber shop that I use has a bird feeder right outside its main window. Cars drive up and park two or three feet away. The birds are used to that and are completely unfazed.

 

When our kids were small, we had a pond out back that accommodated at least one family of wild ducks almost every summer. I've known them to come up and bang on the back door to remind the kids to bring them bread crusts.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,526
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: New member needs help

I got that Robert.  And it can work for the home bodies that set up residence but for the travelers like the Orioles, they don't know you ain't a threat.  If you are content with shooting the regulars, have at it.  We even have names of some of ours but it's more rewarding to see new ones come and go.  Don't you think?

A lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,533
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: New member needs help


RobertTheFat wrote:

ebiggs1 wrote:

"Then you can take as many pictures as you like with pretty much any lens ..."

 

You don't do any bird photos do you Robert?  What about the birds that are traveling through? The migrants?  Why don't you give it a try, "with a modicum of telephoto", and I will use the suggested 400mil?


I guess I didn't make my point clear. When I said that, I was referring to birds that congregate at your feeder and are used to seeing you hanging around with your camera. For birds that eschew feeders and generally stay high, like many predatory and migratory birds, of course you need a long lens.

 

What I was driving at is that if you have a feeder, you don't have to hide in the distance and use a really long lens. Birds that frequent feeders quickly figure out who's a threat (cats, larger birds, etc.) and who isn't (photographers, especially those carrying bags of birdseed) and will usually allow you to get reasonably close.

 

The barber shop that I use has a bird feeder right outside its main window. Cars drive up and park two or three feet away. The birds are used to that and are completely unfazed.

 

When our kids were small, we had a pond out back that accommodated at least one family of wild ducks almost every summer. I've known them to come up and bang on the back door to remind the kids to bring them bread crusts.


In my experience, that sort of, uh, domestication takes time.  Lots of time, spanning generations.  When I was young my we had a feeder in the backyard, which was mounted in an apple tree.  While it was about 20 feet from the house, it was also so high up off the ground that you need a  ladder to reach it and refill it.

 

Initially, birds were somewhat wary of it, especially with humans coming and going from the back door, which was over 30 feet away.  It was first mounted in the spring, but it took until mid-summer for birds to visit it, and then they took flight at the first sign of a human.  The birds were wrens.  The next spring we noticed a nest seemed to be nearby, because we heard young birds chirping.  And, it was during that summer that birds seemed to frequent the feeder more.  They kept coming until we had to cut down the apple tree because of its' age.  i was a good four stories tall when it was cut down.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎02-12-2017

Re: New member needs help

Where can I get the best deal on a 80D? I am willing to buy refurbised if done by Canon.

 

John

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,960
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: New member needs help

Forum rules don't let us post businesses. Just Google "refurbished Canon 80D" and see what you get. Check the reviews on the business if its not one you are familiar and comfortable with.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 2,890
Registered: ‎06-11-2013

Re: New member needs help

You can them in the refurbished section of the Canon online store.  That page is here:

 

https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/cameras/refurbished-eos-digital-slr-cameras

 

The 80D is available in body-only or body+lens version in the refurbished store.

 

The refurb store price tends to be the best price you can find on the camera.  There are (unfortunately) some bait & switch scams that will advertise a price that seems too good to be true (because it is too good to be true).  So if you find a lower price than the refurbished store lists... you should exercise caution.

 

Tim Campbell
5D III, 5D IV, 60Da
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎02-12-2017

Re: New member needs help

I took your advice and ordered a 80D and a 18 x 200 IS from the refurb store. Already looking at a longer lens. They have a 75x300 that does not have IS. Thoughts?
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,960
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: New member needs help

Unlike some of the EF-S STM lenses, the 75-300 zooms are woth what they cost. Stay away from them.

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472
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