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Respected Contributor
Posts: 1,749
Registered: ‎02-26-2015

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?

[ Edited ]

Waddizzle wrote:

TTMartin wrote:

The B+W 58mm XS-Pro Clear MRC-Nano 007 Filter costs $30. Half the replacement cost* of the EF-S 18-55 IS or the EF-S 75-300.

* EX+ condition at KEH


The same filter can fit either lens, which is one quarter of YOUR cited replacement cost of both lenses.  



And having to change the filter when you change the lens in the field? You really need to get out from behind the computer and do some real world photography. 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,898
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?


TTMartin wrote:

And having to change the filter when you change the lens in the field? You really need to get out from behind the computer and do some real world photography. 


Okay, I'll do that.  Meanwhile, I'll stick with my advice to keep MOM happy.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-02-2017

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?

Oh wow, okay. I'll get the cleaning supplies right away, and a couple of hoods. I'll have to hold off on the lens filters, since $60 on top of the rest is a bit out of my budget currently.

Thank you all so much.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,419
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?


Waddizzle wrote:

kitkat wrote:
I recently bought a Canon T5 bundle without really knowing the first thing about cameras. I'd like to learn, though, which is why I bought it.

My mother tells me I absolutely, definitely, 100% must get a lens filter to protect the lens, but I've read conflicting theories on whether or not it's a good idea, so I've come here to ask. I have heard people say that lens hoods give better protection, but I'm still unsure.

I got the camera on clearance for very cheap, and I'm on an extremely limited budget, so I'm unable to spend a lot on accessories, but I also don't want to fail to protect what I've got.

Others have already pretty much exhausted the pros and cons of protective filters.  If you do buy a filter, I would recommend buying a clear filter.  You do not need a UV filter because there is a UV filter built into your digital camera.

 

If you do buy a clear protective filter, then it will not be as expensive as previously described.  Your lenses will need a 58mm filter, which costs about half of previous estimates.  I would recommend the B+W 58mm XS-Pro Clear MRC-Nano 007 Filter.  The same filter can fit either of your lenses, so you can buy one filter, or two.  

 

The best course of action may be to keep Mom happy.  Buy the clear filter, not a UV filter.  For technical reasons, nearly all digital cameras have a UV filter built into their image sensor assembly.  With the use of a filter, then the use of a hood, to shield the filter from light hitting it from angles outside of the field of view, becomes all the more important.  Look for 3rd party hoods, too..


I don't see any reason to prefer a "clear" filter over a UV filter; I'd buy whichever one is cheaper. And it wouldn't surprise me if the clear filter turned out to be more expensive than a UV filter of equivalent quality.

 

Ordinary window glass does a good job of filtering out UV. That's why hospital sunrooms, where unfiltered sunlight is considered beneficial, use special glass that doesn't filter UV out. Auto glass filters UV, which is why photochromic sunglasses don't work well in a car. The glass used in lenses does pass UV (or at least some of it), and in the film days many films were sensitive to UV. This was considered detrimental in most cases, hence the use of a UV filter. But as Waddizzle points out, digital cameras get rid of UV before the light hits the sensor, so whether an additional filter passes UV or not is irrelevant.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,185
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?

Just to reiterate - cleaning "supplies" should be limited to a Rocket blower or similar device. Squeeze to blow dust of the lens surface.

 

Never use canned air or other such product.

 

Until you gain experience and understand what is going on don't try cleaning anything inside the mirror chamber. Too many horror stories posted on the orum of folks who did that and damaged parts. When you chnage lenses keep the camera opening facing down and don't do it when dust/breeze is blowing.

 

 

John Hoffman
Conway, NH

1D X, Rebel T5i, Many lenses, Pixma PRO-100, MX472
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,419
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?


jrhoffman75 wrote:

Just to reiterate - cleaning "supplies" should be limited to a Rocket blower or similar device. Squeeze to blow dust of the lens surface.

 

Never use canned air or other such product.

 

Until you gain experience and understand what is going on don't try cleaning anything inside the mirror chamber. Too many horror stories posted on the orum of folks who did that and damaged parts. When you chnage lenses keep the camera opening facing down and don't do it when dust/breeze is blowing.


I'll second John's point. Not wanting to change lenses outdoors is one of the two reasons that many of us often carry two cameras, (The other is that with certain kinds of photography things happen so rapidly that you don't have time for lens changes. And when you're rushed, you're not as careful.)

 

And to John's other point: Having your camera professionally cleaned and inspected every couple of years can pay dividends. It isn't exactly cheap, but neither is remediation of a botched DIY project.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
Honored Contributor
Posts: 7,796
Registered: ‎12-07-2012

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?

"Having your camera professionally cleaned and inspected every couple of years ..."

 

Good advise. Remember, never put anything smaller than a football in the mirror box of your Rebel.  Even the Rocket Blower, which I think is a good tool, has limited use.

A lot of Canon stuff. Along with, a lot of other stuff.
Super Contributor
Posts: 159
Registered: ‎01-31-2017

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?


kitkat wrote:
I recently bought a Canon T5 bundle without really knowing the first thing about cameras. I'd like to learn, though, which is why I bought it.

My mother tells me I absolutely, definitely, 100% must get a lens filter to protect the lens, but I've read conflicting theories on whether or not it's a good idea, so I've come here to ask. I have heard people say that lens hoods give better protection, but I'm still unsure.

I got the camera on clearance for very cheap, and I'm on an extremely limited budget, so I'm unable to spend a lot on accessories, but I also don't want to fail to protect what I've got.

I use a UV filter on my lenses whenever I'm out shooting -- not to filter out UV light, but for lens protection. I favor shooting in nature -- the California desert, mountain areas, wooded areas, and seashore. I don't have enough confidence in lens hoods to protect my lenses in these environments. And to date, I have not noticed any degradation of image quality, flaring or other obvious abnormalities. I do this even though I have only inexpensive kit lenses, but everytime I am out, it doesn't seem to take terribly long to discover small specks of dust or a grain or two of sand on the filter surface. So I am glad that I have that protection.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 4,898
Registered: ‎08-13-2015

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?


kitkat wrote:
Oh wow, okay. I'll get the cleaning supplies right away, and a couple of hoods. I'll have to hold off on the lens filters, since $60 on top of the rest is a bit out of my budget currently.

Thank you all so much.

I bought a complete "Lens Cleaning Kit" that was made by Zeiss, which included an air blower, a retractable lipstick cleaning brush, pre-moistened wipes, micro fiber cloth, cleaning fluid, and it comes in an lint free, cloth bag.  

 

It's my emergency first aid kit, which I carry in my camera bag when I go out.  In the course of three years since I bought it, I have only used the blower a couple of times.  In fact, the blower is the only tool in the kit that I have had need to use.  I have a few lenses that have never had their front elements cleaned.

 

Learn to observe good habits when it comes to changing lenses and using your gear.  Most of it is common sense, but there are a few unforeseen pitfalls that you learn through experience.  Others have mentioned not changing lenses outdoors, because their is usually a lot of airborne particles outdoors. 

 

Always change your lenses in a clean environement, free of breezes and wind drafts.  For example, I have learned to never change lenses sitting in a car with the A/C blasting away.  This was one of those times that I needed the blower. 

 

Beware of opening the camera body in high humidity environments, which only traps high humidty air inside of the camera body where it will only eventually condense on the image sensor and other places.

 

Finally, first and foremost, keep MOM happy.

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"I don't rent software. I use Photoshop CS6, ACR 9.8 and Lightroom 6.8 ."
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 3,419
Registered: ‎06-25-2014

Re: Do I need a lens filter for protection?


Waddizzle wrote:
Finally, first and foremost, keep MOM happy.

Some of the worst decisions I ever made, and some of the best, stemmed from trying to placate my mother. For example, I once attended, with great reluctance, a party (the 1960s equivalent of a high-end dating bar) to which my mother had wangled a colleague into getting me invited. She had made it abundantly clear that if I didn't go, she would be mortified to face her colleague ever again.

 

I never met the colleague, but I did meet my future wife at that party. We've been married for 50 years.

Bob
Boston, Massachusetts USA
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